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TitrePermafrost coast sensitivity to air temperature and storm influence on Pullen Island, N.W.T.
AuteurBay, B H; Whalen, D; Lim, M
SourceArcticNet, ASM2019 Annual Science Meeting: abstracts/ArcticNet, ASM2019 Réunion scientifique annuelle : abstracts/ArcticNet, ASM2019 Annual Science Meeting: abstracts; 2019 p. 154 (Accès ouvert)
LiensOnline - En ligne (complete volume - volume complet, PDF, 2.80 MB)
Année2019
Séries alt.Ressources naturelles Canada, Contribution externe 20200480
ÉditeurArcticNet
RéunionASM2019 - ArcticNet Annual Science Meetin; Halifax, NS; CA; décembre 2-5, 2019
Documentlivre
Lang.anglais
Mediaen ligne; numérique
Formatspdf
ProvinceTerritoires du Nord-Ouest
SNRC107C/11
Lat/Long OENS-135.0000 -134.0000 69.8333 69.6667
Sujetspergélisol; glace fossile; milieu côtièr; érosion côtière; tempêtes; temperature; effets climatiques; glissements de terrain; glissements de pentes; glissements; télédétection; travaux de prospection; dégel du pergélisol; changement climatique; géologie des dépôts meubles/géomorphologie; géologie de l'environnement; géophysique; Nature et environnement; Sciences et technologie
Diffusé2019 12 01
Résumé(disponible en anglais seulement)
The ice-rich cliffs along the Canadian Beaufort Sea are subject to the rapid erosion characteristic of permafrost coasts. The Mackenzie Delta region experiences, on average, 1 m/yr coastal erosion, with rates in excess of 20 m/yr reported at some sites. Thaw-related erosion presents a unique problem to investigating the effects of changing weather trends on coastal dynamics; warming temperatures not only affect erosion indirectly by increasing energy to storms, but also have a direct influence on thaw rates. Two predominant failure mechanisms are identified for this study. Failure of intact frozen blocks, attributed to undercutting from wave action, is a dramatic and episodic process, characteristic of the permafrost cliffs along the Beaufort Sea coast. Slumping, a gravity driven movement of active layer sediments with the potential to form sprawling thaw complexes through rapid, retrogressive headwall retreat, is also present throughout the Mackenzie Delta region. Pullen Island, one of the outer islands of the Mackenzie Delta, exhibits both block failure and slumping along fairly constrained cliff sections, allowing the investigation of relationships between weather trends and erosion rates with regard to specific failure mechanisms. We use aerial imagery and ground survey data to show that mean erosion rates increased progressively from 0 + 4.8 m/a in 1947 to 12 + 0.3 m/a in 2018, accompanied by an increase in the variability of erosion rate across the study area. The increased heterogeneity of the cliff retreat rate is likely a result of different magnitudes of response to changing weather trends depending on erosive mechanism, and thus the morphological differences (such as cliff height and ground ice occurrence) which prescribe the mechanism. When compared to the summer air temperature and storm records, it was found that a correlation exists between mean erosion rate and both temperature and storm duration. However, when the study area is sub-divided based on erosive mechanism, the correlation with summer air temperature was stronger in areas where slumping was dominant than in block failure areas. Similarly, the correlation with storm duration was stronger in areas where block failure was the dominant mechanism compared to slumping areas. These data indicate that storm duration has the greatest impact on these ice-rich permafrost coasts and most acutely on areas undergoing block failures, whilst air temperature has a greater impact on slump-dominated areas than elsewhere along the coast. Coastal sites are typically assessed based on mean retreat rates for the entire surveyed section. Areas chosen for study because of a single erosive mechanism of interest are likely to show a fairly uniform change in erosion rate. However, the presence of multiple erosion mechanisms, with mixed response to the changing climate, can complicate projections of future coastal change. Based on observations at Pullen Island, we can expect coastal erosion rates across the Beaufort Sea area to increase and diversify in response to the current and projected climate trends.
GEOSCAN ID327396