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TitreTechniques for soil sample analyses
TéléchargerTéléchargement (publication entière)
AuteurMcNeil, R J; Garrett, R G; Friske, P W B
SourcePresentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010; par Rencz, A N (éd.); Kettles, I M (éd.); Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645, 2011 p. 20; 1 CD-ROM, https://doi.org/10.4095/287944
Année2011
ÉditeurRessources naturelles Canada
RéunionWorkshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment; Halifax; CA; mars 17-18, 2010
Documentdossier public
Lang.anglais
DOIhttps://doi.org/10.4095/287944
MediaCD-ROM; en ligne; numérique
Référence reliéeCette publication est contenue dans Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645
Référence reliéeCette publication est reliée Friske, P W B; Ford, K L; Kettles, I M; McCurdy, M W; McNeil, R J; Harvey, B A; (2010). North American soil geochemical landscapes project: Canadian field protocols for collecting mineral soils and measuring soil gas radon and natural radioactivity, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6282
Référence reliéeCette publication est contenue dans Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645
Formatspdf
ProvinceColombie-Britannique; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Québec; Nouveau-Brunswick; Nouvelle-Écosse; Île-du-Prince-Édouard; Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador; Territoires du Nord-Ouest; Yukon; Nunavut
SNRC1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long OENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Sujetsanalyse environnementales; etudes de l'environnement; géochimie du sol; sols; études pédologiques; échantillons de sol; propriétés du sol; levés géochimiques; pédologie; Cénozoïque; Quaternaire
Consultation
Endroit
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Ottawa (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Calgary (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Commission géologique du Canada (Atlantique)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Vancouver (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Québec (Sciences de la Terre)
 
ProgrammeEcosystems Risk Characterization, Géoscience de l'environnement
LiensCanadian Database of Geochemical Surveys, downloadable files
LiensBanque de données de levés géochimiques du Canada, fichiers téléchargeables
Diffusé2011 01 01
Résumé(disponible en anglais seulement)
Geochemical data has a major role in ecological and human health risk assessments. The final soil quality guideline is the lowest concentration value for individual elements deemed acceptable for different types of land use. In addition to the inherent mineralogical characteristics of the soils, concentration values resulting from geochemical analyses are strongly affected by the methodologies used for sample preparation and analyses. However, in most guidance documents for risk assessments, little information is provided on the requirements for sample preparation and analysis.
The choice of appropriate methodology should include consideration of the following factors:
(1) the grain-size fraction analyzed and the efficiency of the grain-size separation. Chemical partitioning studies indicate the greatest concentrations of specific minerals occur within certain grain sizes in glacial sediments. Selection of grain-size fraction is based on the needs of the geochemical survey. The <2 mm fraction is a standard for agricultural and environmental studies and its use is recommended to provide consistency. Finer size fractions including <63 micron and <2 micron have been used for mineral exploration and geological research. Use of the finer size fractions may provide more information on bioaccessibility and inferred information on speciation.
(2) the weight of the sample analyzed. Sample size affects analytical precision. There is a minimum weight of sample for individual analytical methods to achieve reliable, representative and reproducible results.
(3) the temperature of sample drying and analyses. Volatile elements, such as Hg and As require low temperature storage, preparation, and analytical techniques. Air drying at less than 30o C is recommended.
(4) the chemical digestions and other treatments used to decompose the sample prior to analysis. Chemical digestions include total (e.g., 4 acid), near-total (e.g., the relatively strong Aqua Regia and its variants), partial selective extractions for specific mineral or organic phases, and the weak water leach. Digestions are selected based on research goals and geological factors related to mineralogy and they are critical to the application of geochemical analyses results.
(5) the instrument used for analysis. There are common methods, each of which are advantageous in some situations and unsuitable in others. They include the widely-used inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) for major elements and inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for trace and minor elements; instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA) that provides total element concentrations; atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) that has historical and specialized uses, and x-ray
fluorescence (XRF) which is used to measure major elements in whole rock.
(6) the procedures used to ensure quality control and quality assurance (QA/QC). These include the use of blind duplicates and controlled reference materials inserted for analysis in batches of sample for routine analysis. QA/ QC results are monitored to ensure they fall within pre-determined tolerances to ensure adequate data quality. Both graphical monitoring tools and statistical summaries are available. When data fall out of tolerance it is essential that situations are discussed with the service laboratory to rectify any problems.
GEOSCAN ID287944