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TitreSampling protocols for soil geochemical surveys
TéléchargerTéléchargement (publication entière)
AuteurMcNeil, R J
SourcePresentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010; par Rencz, A N (éd.); Kettles, I M (éd.); Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645, 2011 p. 19; 1 CD-ROM, https://doi.org/10.4095/287943
Année2011
ÉditeurRessources naturelles Canada
RéunionWorkshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment; Halifax; CA; mars 17-18, 2010
Documentdossier public
Lang.anglais
DOIhttps://doi.org/10.4095/287943
MediaCD-ROM; en ligne; numérique
Référence reliéeCette publication est contenue dans Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645
Référence reliéeCette publication est reliée Friske, P W B; Ford, K L; Kettles, I M; McCurdy, M W; McNeil, R J; Harvey, B A; (2010). North American soil geochemical landscapes project: Canadian field protocols for collecting mineral soils and measuring soil gas radon and natural radioactivity, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6282
Référence reliéeCette publication est contenue dans Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645
Formatspdf
ProvinceColombie-Britannique; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Québec; Nouveau-Brunswick; Nouvelle-Écosse; Île-du-Prince-Édouard; Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador; Territoires du Nord-Ouest; Yukon; Nunavut
SNRC1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long OENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Sujetsanalyse environnementales; etudes de l'environnement; géochimie du sol; sols; échantillons de sol; contamination des métaux lourds; pollution; substances polluantes; biogéochimie; levés biochimiques; levés géochimiques; géochimie; géologie de l'environnement; pédologie; Cénozoïque; Quaternaire
Consultation
Endroit
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Ottawa (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Calgary (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Commission géologique du Canada (Atlantique)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Vancouver (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Québec (Sciences de la Terre)
 
ProgrammeEcosystems Risk Characterization, Géoscience de l'environnement
LiensCanadian Database of Geochemical Surveys, downloadable files
LiensBanque de données de levés géochimiques du Canada, fichiers téléchargeables
Diffusé2011 01 01
Résumé(disponible en anglais seulement)
The protocols used for the field collection of soil samples in Canada for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project are described in detail in Geological Survey of Canada Open File 6282. This document is available on-line at http://geopub.nrcan.gc.ca/moreinfo e.php?id=261633& h=6282 [accessed March 14, 2010].
The collection of soil samples for geochemical analysis involves preparation in the office as well as work in the field. If the purpose of the survey is to provide an estimate of the background range of element concentrations in soil, use of a spatially random and statistically defensible sampling design is required. In the office, target and alternative sites are determined based on the sample design and study of existing maps showing the distribution of bedrock, surficial materials and soils, and also topographic maps showing road access and the lay of the land. It is also necessary to design a field card that includes information on site location and description, the underlying types of surficial materials and bedrock, descriptions of the soil pit and soil materials collected from the pit. The field card can be modified as needed to meet field conditions. Site and pit photographs are important for archiving and referencing to complement the field
card information.
Horizon based sampling is recommended, otherwise varying amounts of organic matter, Fe- and Mnsesquioxides, and clays will influence trace element concentrations due to the varying amounts of their presence. Sampling by horizon allows for an easier interpretation of geochemical variation if samples are collected from similar pedologic horizons. Horizon-based sampling requires familiarization of the soils of the study region through review of the literature. When beginning work in a new study area it can prove to be quite helpful to have a field meeting with soil scientist familiar with local soils and learn what to expect and how to discriminate between horizons and sub-horizons. To provide information on the parent materials, a sample is collected from the C-horizon which at most sites in Canada is reached by a depth of 1 m. Depending on the project purpose, samples will be collected from other horizons (O, A or B). It may also be desirable to collect a sample from the 0-5 cm depth interval referred to as the Public Health (PH) layer. Although the PH layer is not a pedologic horizon, it is the depth that most strongly affects human exposure.
Samples should be collected using a standard set of equipment. A list of suggested equipment is given in Open File 6282. Stainless steel should not be used to avoid contamination and if the sampling tool is covered by paint, have it removed possibly by sand. Once in the field, a pit is excavated to allow visible distinction of different horizons and the collection of samples from the desired horizons for geochemical analysis and other types of tests such as bulk density and carbonate content determinations. Sampling begins with the lowermost horizon and sampling upwards through the profile minimizes cross-contamination of the horizons. Kraft paper bags are recommended for sampling as canvas sample bags are often treated with elements such as As or Sb to guard against mildew. To prevent loss of volatile elements such as Hg and As, samples should be stored, shipped and dried in areas where the temperature remains below 30o C.
GEOSCAN ID287943