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TitreHuman health risk assessments
TéléchargerTéléchargement (publication entière)
AuteurLongpré, D
SourcePresentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010; par Rencz, A N (éd.); Kettles, I M (éd.); Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645, 2011 p. 10; 1 CD-ROM, https://doi.org/10.4095/287935
Année2011
ÉditeurRessources naturelles Canada
RéunionWorkshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment; Halifax; CA; mars 17-18, 2010
Documentdossier public
Lang.anglais
DOIhttps://doi.org/10.4095/287935
MediaCD-ROM; en ligne; numérique
Référence reliéeCette publication est contenue dans Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645
Référence reliéeCette publication est reliée à Friske, P W B; Ford, K L; Kettles, I M; McCurdy, M W; McNeil, R J; Harvey, B A; (2010). North American soil geochemical landscapes project: Canadian field protocols for collecting mineral soils and measuring soil gas radon and natural radioactivity, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6282
Référence reliéeCette publication est contenue dans Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Commission géologique du Canada, Dossier public 6645
Formatspdf
ProvinceColombie-Britannique; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Québec; Nouveau-Brunswick; Nouvelle-Écosse; Île-du-Prince-Édouard; Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador; Territoires du Nord-Ouest; Yukon; Nunavut
SNRC1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long OENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Sujetsanalyse environnementales; etudes de l'environnement; effets sur l'environnement; géochimie du sol; sols; études pédologiques; échantillons de sol; propriétés du sol; contamination des métaux lourds; pollution; substances polluantes; biogéochimie; levés biochimiques; dépôts glaciaires; tills; levés géochimiques; géochimie; pédologie; géologie des dépôts meubles/géomorphologie; géologie de l'environnement; Cénozoïque; Quaternaire
Consultation
Endroit
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Ottawa (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Calgary (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Commission géologique du Canada (Atlantique)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Vancouver (Sciences de la Terre)
 
Bibliothèque de Ressources naturelles Canada - Québec (Sciences de la Terre)
 
ProgrammeEcosystems Risk Characterization, Géoscience de l'environnement
LiensCanadian Database of Geochemical Surveys, downloadable files
LiensBanque de données de levés géochimiques du Canada, fichiers téléchargeables
Diffusé2011 01 01
Résumé(disponible en anglais seulement)
Before a site is considered contaminated, concentrations of chemicals, particularly natural elements, should be compared to data from local or regional surveys of background soil quality in uncontaminated areas, if data are available. On-site levels would be considered to be consistent with background where the maximum measured concentration of a COPC is less than or equal to a representative statistic for background concentration. If it is found that concentrations of Contaminants of Potential Concern (COPCs) at the site are representative of background levels, then the site may not be contaminated despite the fact that generic environmental quality guidelines are exceeded. In a human health risk assessment, if concentrations of a contaminant are within the range of local or regional background conditions, the contaminant should be excluded from further consideration as a COPC.
The concept of background concentrations of chemicals varies among jurisdictions. Potential background levels can be derived from data taken from control sites located close to, but outside the influence of the contaminated site, or may be based on more regional values. Whichever concept is employed, there is a need for a standardized approach to assessing the availability and appropriateness of data on background levels, or evaluating the need for sampling background concentrations at a reference site. CCME Soil Quality Guidelines - Human Health Many contaminants, particularly metals, are naturally occurring, and natural levels can exceed CCME soil quality guidelines and other generic guidelines without representing anthropogenic contamination. When setting national guidelines, the CCME derives guideline values by determining the tolerable or essentially negligible concentration of a contaminant above the background (natural) level (CCME, 2006). The CCME also recognizes that natural levels in soil vary spatially, and recommends that local soil quality objectives be established that incorporate local or regional background concentrations if they are significantly different from the background value used in the derivation of the national generic guideline for a particular contaminant (CCME, 1996).
In principle, for threshold contaminants, the total exposure from direct soil pathways should not generally exceed typical background soil exposures by more than 20% of the residual tolerable daily intake (RTDI), although >20% may be allotted under certain circumstances. If the chemical is identified as a non-threshold substance by Health Canada, then a guideline will be developed
GEOSCAN ID287935