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TitleModelling ground ice abundance in the Slave Geological Province
 
AuthorO'Neill, BORCID logo; Wolfe, SORCID logo; Duchesne, CORCID logo
SourceArcticNet 2021 Annual Scientific Meeting abstracts; Arctic Science vol. 8, no. 1, 2022 p. 99-100, https://doi.org/10.1139/as-2022-0002 Open
Access logo Open Access
Image
Year2022
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20210247
PublisherCanadian Science Publishing
MeetingArcticNet Annual Scientific Meeting 2021; December 6-10, 2021
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; digital; on-line
RelatedThis publication is related to Preliminary modelling of ground ice abundance in the Slave Geological Province, Northwest Territories and Nunavut
File formatpdf; html
ProvinceNorthwest Territories; Nunavut
NTS75L; 85M; 76D; 76E; 76L; 76M; 85I; 85J; 85O; 85P; 86A; 86B; 86G; 86H; 86I; 86J; 86O; 86P
AreaYellowknife; Grays Bay
Lat/Long WENS-116.0000 -110.0000 68.0000 62.0000
Lat/Long WENS-116.0000 -110.0000 68.0000 62.0000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; environmental geology; Nature and Environment; Science and Technology; Transport; permafrost; ground ice; periglacial features; modelling; sediments; Slave Province; Canadian Shield; Infrastructures; Planning; Management; Maps
ProgramGEM-GeoNorth: Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals GEM Program Coordination
Released2022 02 18
AbstractNew infrastructure corridors within the Slave Geological Province will provide transportation, hydro, and communications links to mineral rich areas of northern Canada, and connect southern highway systems and Arctic shipping routes. Relatively little information on permafrost and ground ice is available compared with other regions. Ice-rich tills have been characterized from cores near Lac de Gras, and preserved buried ice has been documented within glaciofluvial sediments. Improved knowledge of permafrost and ground ice conditions in the region is required to inform planning and management of infrastructure. Work within the Geological Survey of Canada's (GSC) GEM-GeoNorth program includes mapping periglacial terrain features, synthesizing existing permafrost and surficial data, and modelling ground ice conditions along the transportation corridor. Here we present initial modelling of ground ice abundance using a methodology developed for national-scale mapping for the ground ice map of Canada. By contrast with the previous mapping that uses a nationwide surficial materials data set, we use larger-scale standardized information from GSC Canadian Geoscience Maps (CGM) as model input. We compare outputs for the region derived from the two surficial data sets to assess the influence of surficial geology mapping scale on predicted ground ice abundance. The larger-scale CGM data sets include greater representation of unconsolidated sediments that may contain ground ice, and consequently, the assessed ground ice abundance is higher than represented on the ground ice map of Canada. Therefore, estimates from the ground ice map of Canada should be viewed as conservative for this region and other terrain of the Canadian Shield.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
New infrastructure corridors within the Slave Geological Province will provide transportation, hydro, and communications links to mineral rich areas of northern Canada, and connect southern highway systems and Arctic shipping routes. Relatively little information on permafrost and ground ice is available compared to other regions. Ice-rich tills have been characterized from cores near Lac de Gras, and preserved buried ice has been documented within glaciofluvial sediments. Improved knowledge of permafrost and ground ice conditions in the region is required to inform planning and management of infrastructure. Work within the Geological Survey of Canada's (GSC) GEM-GeoNorth program includes mapping periglacial terrain features, synthesizing existing permafrost and surficial data, and modelling ground ice conditions along the transportation corridor. Here we present initial modelling of ground ice abundance using a methodology developed for national-scale mapping for the Ground ice map of Canada. In contrast with the previous mapping that uses a nationwide surficial materials dataset, we use larger-scale standardized information from GSC Canadian Geoscience Maps (CGM) as model input. We compare outputs for the region derived from the two surficial datasets to assess the influence of surficial geology mapping scale on predicted ground ice abundance. The larger-scale CGM datasets include greater representation of unconsolidated sediments that may contain ground ice, and consequently, the assessed ground ice abundance is higher than represented on the Ground ice map of Canada. Therefore, estimates from the Ground ice map of Canada should be viewed as conservative for this region and other terrain of the Canadian Shield.
GEOSCAN ID328870

 
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