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TitleRegional wetland status and sensitivity to disturbances near Fox Creek, Alberta
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LicencePlease note the adoption of the Open Government Licence - Canada supersedes any previous licences.
AuthorIngram, R; Munir, T M; Xu, B
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Open File 8812, 2021, 66 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/328584 Open Access logo Open Access
Image
Year2021
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentopen file
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceAlberta
NTS83F/09; 83F/10; 83F/11; 83F/12; 83F/13; 83F/14; 83F/15; 83F/16; 83K; 83N/01; 83N/02; 83N/03; 83N/04
AreaFox Creek
Lat/Long WENS-118.0000 -116.0000 55.2500 53.5000
Subjectsenvironmental geology; hydrogeology; surficial geology/geomorphology; Nature and Environment; Science and Technology; Economics and Industry; Agriculture; wetlands; fens; swamps; marshes; bogs; watersheds; terrain sensitivity; surface waters; rivers; lakes; groundwater; vegetation; climate effects; temperature; precipitation; carbon dioxide; hydrologic environment; pipelines; hydraulic fracturing; carbon geochemistry; biogeochemistry; permafrost; ground ice; reclamation; Peace River Watershed; Upper Peace River Subwatershed; Smoky-Wapati Subwatershed; Athabasca River Watershed; Upper Athabasca River Subwatershed; McLeod River Subwatershed; Rangifer tarandus; Little Smoky Caribou Range; boreal ecosystems; mineral wetlands; shallow open waters; hydrology; wildlife; woodland caribou; habitats; conservation; environmental management; disturbances; climate change; forest fires; anthropogenic impacts; forestry industry; petroleum industry; urban development; wildfires; infrastructures; utilities; classification; permafrost thaw; restoration; cumulative effects
Illustrationstables; location maps; geoscientific sketch maps; schematic representations; photographs
ProgramGroundwater Geoscience, Fox Creek Regional Aquifer System
Released2021 07 14
Abstract(unpublished)
Wetlands cover large areas of Alberta's boreal regions. They play critical roles in flow regulation and flood control, groundwater discharge/recharge, and pollutant filtration. Peat-forming bogs and fens sequester and store large amounts of atmospheric CO2 and harbor a variety of wildlife. The Fox Creek study area is located between the Upper Peace River and Upper Athabasca Watersheds. Within the 6501.3 km2 extended study zone, wetlands cover 1344.2 km2 or 20.7% of the area. Fen is the most abundant wetland class (45.5%), followed by swamp (37.2%), shallow open water (9.1%), bog (7.1%), and marsh (1.1%). Within the 90 km2 local study area near Fox Creek, wetland coverage is relatively low at 4.7 km2 or 5.2%. Swamp is the most abundant wetland class (56.8%), followed by fen (36.4%), shallow open water (4.5%), and bog (2.3%). Natural disturbances such as warming and changing fire regimes, and human disturbances such as forestry and oil and gas activities can greatly affect the water balance, hydrology, and vegetation within a watershed, leading to the loss of critical function and services provided by natural wetlands. Reclamation and restoration of boreal wetlands has come a long way since the early 2000s, although significant knowledge gaps and technical challenges remain.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Wetlands cover large areas of Alberta's boreal regions. They play critical roles in flow regulation and flood control, groundwater discharge/recharge, and pollutant filtration. Peat-forming bogs and fens sequester and store large amounts of atmospheric CO2 and harbor a variety of wildlife. The Fox Creek study area is located between the Upper Peace River and Upper Athabasca Watersheds. Within the 6501.3 km2 extended study zone, wetlands cover 1344.2 km2 or 20.7% of the area. Fen is the most abundant wetland class (45.5%), followed by swamp (37.2%), shallow open water (9.1%), bog (7.1%), and marsh (1.1%). Natural disturbances such as warming and fires, and human disturbances such as forestry and oil and gas activities can greatly affect the water balance, hydrology and vegetation within a watershed, leading to the loss of critical function and services provided by natural wetlands. It is thus critical to monitoring them.
GEOSCAN ID328584

 
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