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TitleEmergency Geomatics Service activation for Turtle Mountain, Alberta InSAR monitoring
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LicencePlease note the adoption of the Open Government Licence - Canada supersedes any previous licences.
AuthorLehrbass, B; Samsonov, SORCID logo; Dudley, J; Svacina, N; Drouin, HORCID logo; Decker, V; Tolszczuk-Leclerc, S
SourceGeomatics Canada, Open File 64, 2021, 19 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/328268 Open Access logo Open Access
Image
Year2021
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentopen file
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceAlberta
NTS82G/09
AreaTurtle Mountain; Frank; Rocky Mountains
Lat/Long WENS-114.5000 -114.0000 49.7500 49.5000
Subjectsgeophysics; Science and Technology; Nature and Environment; Health and Safety; remote sensing; satellite imagery; radar methods; landslides; slope stability analyses; slope failures; deformation; displacement; Emergency Geomatics Service; RADARSAT-2; RADARSAT Constellation Mission; geological hazards; monitoring; interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR); geomatics; rock avalanches; methodology; datasets; archival datasets
Illustrationslocation maps; satellite images; 3-D images; geoscientific sketch maps; cross-sections; tables
ProgramCanada Centre for Remote Sensing, Emergency Geomatics
Released2021 05 20
AbstractThe Frank Slide in 1903 caused the deaths of more than 70 people, and there remains a risk of a second rock avalanche. Since then, many different methods have been used to monitor the slope for signs of movement. On April 8, 2020, the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) contacted the Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation (CCMEO) with a request for emergency assistance to monitor Turtle Mountain for deformation using interferometric synthetic aperture radar following the hardware failure of their ground-based monitoring system. This report describes at a high level the communication, planning, setup, operation, and reporting for this emergency request. Each deformation monitoring program presents a unique challenge, but this methodology can be broadly adapted to similar InSAR monitoring requests in the future. The purpose of this report is to provide a record of the services provided to help guide future geohazards monitoring requests, which may become more frequent with increased landslide risk due to climate change and greater satellite data availability.
Between April 8 and June 30, 2020, 40 images were collected by RADARSAT-2 and RADARSAT Constellation Mission satellites over Turtle Mountain. These images were processed quickly after acquisition and no significant deformation was observed during the monitoring period. Historical deformation of up to 5 cm in the line-of-sight was observed between 2014 and 2020.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The Alberta Geological Survey (AGS), a branch of the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER), is responsible for the long-term monitoring of a potential landslide at Turtle Mountain. They provide a near real-time ground-based remote monitoring network as part of their Turtle Mountain Monitoring Program. Following the hardware failure of their ground-based InSAR monitoring system on April 8, 2020, the AER contacted the Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation (CCMEO) with a request for emergency assistance to monitor Turtle Mountain for deformation using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) with the RADARSAT Constellation Mission and RADARSAT-2. Emergency management and contingency plans were then activated until June 10, 2020, when the AER confirmed that the ground-based InSAR system had been repaired and was collecting valid data. This report summarizes the project setup and monitoring that was performed during the EGS activation.
GEOSCAN ID328268

 
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