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TitleUsing hydrodynamic and bathtub water-level models to assess the current and future storm surge flooding in Tuktoyaktuk
 
AuthorPinheiro, D; Vieira, G; Whalen, DORCID logo; Pina, P; Canário, J; Freitas, P; Stuckey, S
SourceArctic Change 2020 Conference book of abstracts/Compilation de résumés pour la Conférence Arctic; by ArcticNet; Arctic Science vol. 7, no. 1, 2021 p. 122, https://doi.org/10.1139/as-2021-0001 Open Access logo Open Access
Image
Year2021
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20200767
PublisherCanadian Science Publishing
MeetingArctic Change 2020 Conference; December 7-10, 2020
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNorthwest Territories
NTS107C/07
AreaTuktoyaktuk
Lat/Long WENS-134.0000 -133.0000 69.5000 69.2500
Subjectsenvironmental geology; surficial geology/geomorphology; geophysics; Nature and Environment; Science and Technology; Society and Culture; Economics and Industry; coastal environment; floods; flood potential; storms; hydrodynamics; water levels; sea level changes; models; modelling; sea ice; climate effects; erosion; coastal erosion; meteorology; temperature; remote sensing; photogrammetric surveys; mapping techniques; land use; bathymetry; tides; software; planning; Climate change; drones; Socioeconomic analysis; Global positioning systems; mitigation; Mitigation; adaptation
ProgramClimate Change Geoscience Coastal Infrastructure
Released2021 03 15
AbstractArctic warming is leading to an increased reduction in sea ice, with models for 2100 indicating a reduction in the Arctic sea ice area from 43% to 94% in September and from 8% to 34% in February. The increase of the sea-ice free season duration will result in more exposure of the coasts to wave action, with changing climate also modifying the contribution of terrestrial erosion processes. Coastal erosion can also be increased by warmer seawaters and sea-level rise, with more frequent storms and associated surge events leading to the increase in flooding. During the short open water season (June to October) there has been an increase coastal storms (wind speed > 36 km/h and surge level > 1.5 m), and this has led to an increment in coastal erosion and flooding. This work focuses on the Hamlet of Tuktoyaktuk (Northwest Territories, Canada), where extensive ultra-high-resolution surveys with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been conducted, allowing for the generation of orthophoto mosaics, digital surface models (DSM), derived land use, and geomorphological and socio-economic activity maps. DSMs, bathymetry, and meteorological data are used as inputs for flood modelling in MOHID Water software. Validation is conducted using tide gauge and Differential Global Positioning System data from 2019, with the boundary conditions obtained from the FES2014 tide model (Finite Element Solution). Both approaches run on LiDAR data from 2004 and the UAV DSMs for direct comparison. This research is done in cooperation with the Hamlet, with the results being provided as a tool for strategical spatial planning, culminating in more resilient mitigation and adaptation measures to climate change. This research is funded by the European Commission H2020 project NUNATARYUK and by the Climate Change Preparedness in the North Program.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Climate change has frequent coastal storms for the Tuktoyaktuk region. This has led to associated surge events leading to the increase in flooding. During the short open water season (June to October) there has been an increase coastal storms (wind speed > 36 km/h and surge level > 1.5m), this has led to an increased level of coastal erosion and flooding. This work focusses on the Hamlet of Tuktoyaktuk (Northwest Territories, Canada), where extensive ultra-high-resolution surveys with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been conducted, allowing to generate digital surface models (DSM), derived land use,geomorphological and socio-economic activity maps. DSMs, bathymetry and meteorological data are used as inputs for current and future flood modelling estimates of Tuktoyaktuk.
GEOSCAN ID328148

 
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