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TitleField testing innovative differential geospatial and photogrammetric monitoring technologies in mountainous terrain near Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada
 
AuthorHuntley, DORCID logo; Bobrowsky, PORCID logo; Macleod, RORCID logo; Cocking, RORCID logo; Joseph, JORCID logo; Rotheram-Clarke, DORCID logo
SourceJournal of Mountain Science vol. 18, issue 1, 2021 p. 1-20, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11629-020-6552-y Open Access logo Open Access
Image
Year2021
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20200614
PublisherSpringer
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
RelatedNRCan photo(s) in this publication
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia
NTS92I/11
AreaThompson River; Ashcroft
Lat/Long WENS-121.3333 -121.2500 50.7500 50.5833
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; Science and Technology; Nature and Environment; Health and Safety; Transport; landslides; displacement; remote sensing; photogrammetric surveys; satellite imagery; bathymetry; scarps; meteorology; temperature; precipitation; runoff; Ripley Landslide; geological hazards; methodology; change detection; monitoring; global navigation satellite systems (GNSS); Geocube(TM); drones; synthetic aperture radar surveys, airborne; interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR); railway safety; rail transport; infrastructures; digital surface models
Illustrationslocation maps; photographs; tables; geoscientific sketch maps; time series; flow diagrams; 3-D models; satellite images; profiles; plots
ProgramPublic Safety Geoscience, Terrestrial Landslides
Released2021 01 12
AbstractThis paper presents a novel approach to continuously monitor very slow-moving translational landslides in mountainous terrain using conventional and experimental differential global navigation satellite system (d-GNSS) technologies. A key research question addressed is whether displacement trends captured by a radio-frequency 'mobile' d-GNSS network compare with the spatial and temporal patterns in activity indicated by satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry. Field testing undertaken at Ripley Landslide, near Ashcroft in south-central British Columbia, Canada, demonstrates the applicability of new geospatial technologies to monitoring ground control points (GCPs) and railway infrastructure on a landslide with small and slow annual displacements (<10 cm/yr). Each technique records increased landslide activity and ground displacement in late winter and early spring. During this interval, river and groundwater levels are at their lowest levels, while ground saturation rapidly increases in response to the thawing of surficial earth materials, and the infiltration of snowmelt and runoff occurs by way of deep-penetrating tension cracks at the head scarp and across the main slide body. Research over the last decade provides vital information for government agencies, national railway companies, and other stakeholders to understand geohazard risk, predict landslide movement, improve the safety, security, and resilience of Canada's transportation infrastructure; and reduce risks to the economy, environment, natural resources, and public safety.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This paper presents an effective approach to monitor slow-moving landslides in mountainous terrain using conventional and experimental global navigation satellite systems. Research over the last decade provides government agencies, national railway companies, and other stakeholders with vital information to understand geohazard risk, predict landslide movement, improve the safety, security, and resilience of Canada's transportation infrastructure; and reduce risks to the economy, environment, natural resources, and public safety.
GEOSCAN ID327933

 
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