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TitleGround ice in permafrost: thermokarst and hydrogeological implications
AuthorWolfe, S A
SourceGeo Ottawa 2017/Geo Ottawa 2017; 2017 p. 1-8
Year2017
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20200390
PublisherCanadian Geotechnical Society
MeetingGeo Ottawa 2017; Ottawa; CA; October 1-4, 2017
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; environmental geology; hydrogeology; Nature and Environment; Science and Technology; permafrost; ground ice; periglacial features; thermokarst; groundwater; climate change; segregated ice; relict ice; post-formational ice; permafrost thaw; cumulative effects
Illustrationsphotographs; cross-sections; sketches
ProgramClimate Change Geoscience, Permafrost
AbstractThis paper examines three types of ground ice occurring within permafrost. The primary purpose is to identify ground ice potential in present-day permafrost terrain and to understand the impacts that warming will have on the cryosphere. Type 1 (formational) ice forms as permafrost aggrades into unfrozen ground and its excess ice is mainly segregated ice. Type 2 (post-formational) ice develops within permafrost and its excess ice includes wedge, aggradational, and intrusive ice. Type 3 (relict) ice has formed or been deposited on the ground surface and later covered by sediments and its excess ice includes ice that has become buried and preserved within permafrost. Because of the nature of their formation, occurrence, preservation potential, and effect on the land upon thawing, these ice types are important to the discussion of permafrost and hydrogeological interactions. Scenarios of thermokarst development related to the thawing of each ice type are presented as a means to understand the implications of their presence and distribution within permafrost.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This paper examines three types of ground ice occurring within permafrost. Type 1 (formational) ice forms as permafrost aggrades into unfrozen ground and its excess ice is mainly segregated ice. Type 2 (post-formational) ice develops within permafrost and its excess ice includes wedge, aggradational, and intrusive ice. Type 3 (relict) ice has formed or been deposited on the ground surface and later covered by sediments and its excess ice includes ice that has become buried and preserved within permafrost. Because of the nature of their formation, occurrence, preservation potential, and effect on the land upon thawing, these ice types are important to the discussion of permafrost and hydrogeological interactions. Scenarios of thermokarst development related to the thawing of each ice type are presented as a means to understand the implications of their presence and distribution within permafrost.
GEOSCAN ID327179