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TitleDinoflagellate cyst taxonomy of the Late Cretaceous Smoking Hills Formation (Horton-Anderson Plains, NWT)
 
AuthorBringué, MORCID logo; Fensome, R A; Galloway, J MORCID logo
SourceGeoconvention 2020 abstracts; 2020 p. 1-2 Open Access logo Open Access
LinksOnline - En ligne
Image
Year2020
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20190494
PublisherGeoconvention Partnership
MeetingGeoConvention 2020; September 21-23, 2020
DocumentWeb site
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNorthwest Territories
NTS97C/03; 97C/04; 97C/05; 97C/06; 97C/11; 97C/12; 97C/13; 97C/14; 107D/01; 107D/08; 107D/09; 107D/16
AreaSmoking Hills
Lat/Long WENS-128.3333 -126.0000 70.0000 69.0000
Subjectspaleontology; stratigraphy; Nature and Environment; Science and Technology; Upper Cretaceous; Campanian; Santonian; micropaleontology; microfossils; bedrock geology; lithology; sedimentary rocks; shales; biostratigraphy; systematic paleontology; taxonomy; paleoenvironment; Horton-Anderson Plains; Dinoflagellates; Smoking Hills Formation; Kanguk Formation; Sverdrup Basin; Phanerozoic; Mesozoic; Cretaceous
ProgramGEM2: Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals Western Arctic-Beaufort-Northern Yukon
Released2020 09 01
Abstract(Summary)
The Late Cretaceous Kanguk Formation in the Canadian Arctic, and time-equivalent strata in circum-Arctic areas, contain exceptionally abundant, diverse and well-preserved dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts). This study details ongoing taxonomic work on the highly diverse dinoflagellate cyst assemblages of the Smoking Hills Formation, a Santonian to Campanian shale unit considered time equivalent to the middle part of the Kanguk Formation in the Sverdrup Basin. This work constitutes a first step towards detailed biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental studies of Late Cretaceous strata in the region.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The Kanguk Formation in the Canadian Arctic, and time-equivalent strata in other Arctic areas, contain exceptionally abundant, diverse and well-preserved microfossils called dinoflagellate cysts. This study details ongoing taxonomic work on the dinoflagellate cyst assemblages of the Smoking Hills Formation, an Upper Cretaceous shale unit considered time equivalent to the middle part of the Kanguk Formation in the Canadian Arctic. This work constitutes the first step towards detailed biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental studies of late Cretaceous strata in the region.
GEOSCAN ID321636

 
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