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TitleGeological Survey of Canada 8.0: mapping the journey towards predictive geoscience
 
AuthorLebel, DORCID logo
SourceThe changing role of geological surveys; by Hill, P RORCID logo (ed.); Lebel, DORCID logo (ed.); Hitzman, M (ed.); Smelror, M (ed.); Thorleifson, H (ed.); Geological Society, Special Publication vol. 499, issue 1, 79, 2020 p. 49-68, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP499-2019-79 Open Access logo Open Access
Image
Year2020
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20190103
PublisherGeological Society of London
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf; html; xlsx (Microsoft® Excel®)
SubjectsGovernment and Politics; general geology; Science and Technology; mapping techniques; modelling; models; history; Geological Survey Of Canada; geological mapping; predictive mapping; scientific research; federal government; federal programs; methodology; systems approach
Illustrationsgeoscientific sketch maps; schematic representations; time series; photographs; tables; flow diagrams
Released2020 01 16
AbstractThe Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) has been furthering the geoscientific understanding of Canada since its inception in 1842, the equivalent of seven generations ago. The evolution of the activities of the GSC over this period has been driven by evolving geographic, economic and political contexts and needs. Likewise, new technologies and evolving scientific methods and models shaped broadly the successive generations of GSC geoscience activities. The most recent GSC generation presented a mixed portfolio of large framework mapping geoscience programmes, and more targeted, hypothesis-driven geoscience research, and the development of decision support products for a range of government, industry and other stakeholders needs. Entering its eighth generation, the GSC and related organizations are embracing digital technologies for applications such as the evaluation of mineral resource potential, the evaluation of risks and the early warning of earthquakes. In order to do so, the GSC will need to develop new methods and systems in co-operation with other geological survey organizations, and target its data acquisition and research to further advance its ability to respond to the evolving needs of society to navigate geology through space and time, from the past to the present, and from the present to the future.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) has been furthering the geoscientific understanding of Canada since its inception in 1842, the equivalent of seven generations ago. The evolution of the activities of the GSC over this period was driven by evolving geographic, economic and political contexts and needs. Likewise, new technologies and evolving scientific methods and models shaped broadly the successive generations of geoscience activities. The most recent GSC generation presented a portfolio of framework mapping geoscience programs, and more targeted, hypothesis-driven geoscience research, and the development of decision support products for a range of government, industry and other stakeholder needs. The GSC will need to develop new methods and systems. It will target its data acquisition and research to advance its ability to respond to the evolving needs of society to navigate geology through space and time, from the past to the present, and from the present to the future.
GEOSCAN ID314762

 
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