GEOSCAN Search Results: Fastlink

GEOSCAN Menu


TitlePermafrost degradation, subarctic Canadian Shield
DownloadDownloads
AuthorMorse, P D; Wolfe, S A; McWade, T L; Kokelj, S V
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Scientific Presentation 101, 2019, 1 sheet, https://doi.org/10.4095/314643 (Open Access)
Image
Year2019
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf (Adobe® Reader®)
ProvinceNorthwest Territories
NTS85J/06; 85J/07; 85J/09; 85J/10; 85J/11; 85J/14; 85J/15; 85J/16
AreaGreat Slave Lake; Yellowknife
Lat/Long WENS-115.3333 -114.3667 62.9500 62.3833
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; environmental geology; permafrost; ground ice; periglacial features; ice lenses; thermokarst; ground temperatures; subsidence; climate effects; organic deposits; Canadian Shield; permafrost degradation; lithalsas; climate change; lacustrine sediments; glaciolacustrine sediments; geological mapping; air tempuratures; glaciofluvial sediments
Illustrationslocation maps; time series; photographs; aerial photographs; satellite images; profiles; geoscientific sketch maps
ProgramPermafrost, Climate Change Geoscience
Released2019 05 08
AbstractRecent ground temperature and observational data for lithalsas in the subarctic Canadian Shield (permafrost mounds of ice-rich, fine-grained sediments) are examined in the context of an inventory of thermokarst ponding between 1945 and 2005. Results show that many lithalsas are thermally and physically degrading, and widespread thermokarst primarily relates to lithalsa distribution. Future thermokarst development in this region of extensive discontinuous permafrost will continue to be associated with lithalsas that often lack a protective surface organic layer.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Recent ground temperature and observational data for lithalsas in the subarctic Canadian Shield (permafrost mounds of ice-rich, fine-grained sediments) are examined in the context of an inventory of thermokarst ponding (subsidence of the ground due to thaw of ice-rich permafrost and water ponding) between 1945 and 2005. Results show that many lithalsas are thermally and physically degrading, and widespread thermokarst primarily relates to lithalsa distribution. Future thermokarst development in this region of extensive discontinuous permafrost will continue to be associated with lithalsas that often lack a protective surface organic layer.
GEOSCAN ID314643