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TitleChange detection monitoring with InSAR in the Thompson River valley, British Columbia, Canada
AuthorHuntley, D; Bobrowsky, P; Hendry, M; Macciotta, R; Journault, J
SourceResources for Future Generations, Conference Abstracts Volume; 2038, 2018 p. 1
Year2018
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20180460
MeetingRFG2018 - Resources for Future Generations; Vancouver, BC; CA; June 16-21, 2018
DocumentWeb site
Lang.English
Mediapaper; digital
File formatdocx
NTS92I/11
AreaThompson River; Ashcroft; Basque Ranch
Lat/Long WENS-121.3167 -121.2500 50.7500 50.6000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; engineering geology; Transport; geophysics; landslides; mass wasting; transportation; glacial deposits; clays; displacement; remote sensing; satellite imagery; radar methods; surface waters; rivers; groundwater; water levels; groundwater levels; Ripley Landslide; geological hazards; infrastructures; railway networks; RADARSAT-2; InSAR; inferometric synthetic aperture radar; monitoring
ProgramMarine Geohazards, Public Safety Geoscience
Released2018 06 01
AbstractCanada's national railway transportation corridor traverses a 10 km-long section of unstable terrain in the Thompson River valley, British Columbia. From Ashcroft (50.75ºN, 121.25ºW) to Basque Ranch (50.60ºN, 121.31ºW), landslides occur in glacial deposits and slide at very slow rates (mm to cm/yr) on weak clay layers; although in prehistoric times, larger slide masses moved more rapidly. To help evaluate the potential risks associated with railway operations, recent landslide activity was monitored using Coherent Points Analyses and Differential Stacking of RADARSAT-2 InSAR persistent scatterer interferograms. Surface displacements amounting to less than 5 cm/yr are detected on landslides crossed by railway infrastructure (CN and CP train tracks and lock-block retaining walls). Many landslides have zones of displacement that are more active than other parts of the slope. Seasonal changes in river stage and groundwater level lead to marked variations in displacement rates in these zones. InSAR techniques effectively capture the surface movement detected by GPS stations, ground-based LiDAR, borehole piezometers and fibre optic installations at the Ripley Landslide test site. This successful application suggests InSAR is suitable for monitoring unstable terrain in other remote settings where transportation infrastructure, natural resources, the environment, local communities and public safety are at risk.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Canada's national railway transportation corridor traverses a 10 km-long section of unstable terrain in the Thompson River valley, British Columbia. Remote sensing techniques effectively capture the surface movement detected by other installations at the Ripley Landslide test site. Remote sensing is suitable for monitoring unstable terrain in other remote settings where transportation infrastructure, natural resources, the environment, local communities and public safety are at risk.
GEOSCAN ID314573