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TitleUsing multi-dimensional ERT modelling to provide new insight into the hydrogeological structure of a very slow-moving landslide in glacial sediments, Thompson River valley, British Columbia, Canada
AuthorHuntley, D H; Bobrowsky, P; Hendry, M; Macciotta, R; Elwood, D; Sattler, K; Reeve, H J; Chambers, J E; Meldrum, P; Holmes, J; Wilkinson, P
SourceGeological Society of America, Abstracts With Programs vol. 50, no. 6, 279-12, 2018 p. 1, https://doi.org/10.1130/abs/2018AM-315950
Year2018
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20180457
PublisherGeological Society of America
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formathtml
ProvinceBritish Columbia
NTS92I/11
AreaThompson River; Ashcroft
Lat/Long WENS-121.5000 -121.2500 50.7500 50.6000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; hydrogeology; geophysics; landslides; displacement; scarps; slope stability analyses; slope failures; glacial deposits; groundwater; soil moisture; hydrologic environment; hydrologic properties; geophysical surveys; electrical surveys; electrical resistivity; surface waters; rivers; flow systems; pore pressures; terrain analysis; modelling; Ripley Landslide; geological hazards; electrical resistivity tomography; tension cracks; landslide escarpments; monitoring; proactive infrastructure monitoring and evaluation
ProgramMarine Geohazards, Public Safety Geoscience
Released2018 11 01
AbstractLandslides in the Thompson River valley, southwestern British Columbia, are monitored by the railway industry, universities and government agencies to better manage geohazard risks in the primary national transportation corridor. The consequences of landslide activity in this study area include adverse impacts on: 1) vital railway infrastructure and operations; 2) sensitive ecosystems and natural freshwater resources; and 3) public safety, local communities, cultural heritage features and Canada's economy. Current research efforts are focused on the 0.04 km2 Ripley Landslide. Surface displacement, tension cracks and scarps on active slopes are monitored by experimental global positioning systems, satellite radar interferometry and photogrammetry using unmanned aerial vehicles. Slope inclinometers, acoustic emission monitors and piezometers capture changes in sub-surface movement and changes in groundwater levels. Merged 2D and 3D ERT datasets have captured a clear static proxy image of soil moisture and groundwater conditions in surficial deposits and bedrock for November 2013 (land) and 2014 (river). Continuous (real-time) ERT monitoring has now been deployed to characterize the long-term hydrological behaviour of geological units in the landslide. In November 2017, an array of 74 electrodes were positioned across the slide body and connected to a proactive infrastructure monitoring and evaluation (PRIME) system with internet access via a modem. This installation captures dynamic changes in electrical resistivity of the hydrogeological units, and is helping to better define surface water and groundwater flow paths in the main slide body, and their relationship to fluctuating porewater pressures and landslide activity. A greater understanding of the composition and internal structure of slope failures in the valley is gained at the test site from terrain analysis and modelling of 2D, 3D and 4D geophysical datasets. This insight helps with the interpretation of multi-year monitoring datasets and guides future efforts to monitor landslide activity in the valley.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Landslides in the Thompson River valley, southwestern British Columbia, are monitored by the railway industry, universities and government agencies to better manage geohazard risks in the primary national transportation corridor. A greater understanding of the composition and internal structure of slope failures in the valley is gained at the test site from terrain analysis and modelling of 2D, 3D and 4D geophysical datasets. This insight helps with the interpretation of multi-year monitoring datasets and guides future efforts to monitor landslide activity in the valley.
GEOSCAN ID314570