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TitleOptimization of low impact development placement through shallow subsurface characterization
DownloadDownload (whole publication)
AuthorHarvey, T; Wilson, M
SourceRegional-Scale Groundwater Geoscience in Southern Ontario: An Ontario Geological Survey, Geological Survey of Canada, and Conservation Ontario Geoscientists Open House; by Russell, H A J; Ford, D; Holysh, S; Priebe, E H; Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 8528, 2019 p. 14, https://doi.org/10.4095/313585 (Open Access)
Year2019
Alt SeriesOntario Geological Survey, Open File Report 6349
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
PublisherGovernment of Ontario
MeetingRegional-Scale Groundwater Geoscience in Southern Ontario: Open House; Guelph; CA; February 27-28, 2019
Documentopen file
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Russell, H A J; Ford, D; Holysh, S; Priebe, E H; (2019). Regional-Scale Groundwater Geoscience in Southern Ontario: An Ontario Geological Survey, Geological Survey of Canada, and Conservation Ontario Geoscientists Open House, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 8528
File formatpdf
ProvinceOntario
NTS30; 31B; 31C; 31D; 31E; 31G; 40; 41A; 41G; 41H/03; 41H/04; 41H/05; 41H/06; 41H/12; 41H/13
AreaSouthern Ontario; Lake Simcoe; East Holland River; Regional Municipality of York
Lat/Long WENS -84.0000 -74.0000 46.0000 41.5000
Subjectshydrogeology; regional geology; surficial geology/geomorphology; urban planning; regional planning; groundwater; aquifers; groundwater geochemistry; groundwater resources; water quality; groundwater pollution; recharge rates; land use; bedrock geology; lithology; sediments; watersheds; water levels; urban development; low impact development; policy; geographic information systems
Released2019 02 08
AbstractUrban stormwater is estimated to account for approximately 30% of the phosphorus loading to Lake Simcoe. In addition to phosphorus, urban stormwater from impervious surfaces can contribute sediment, hydrocarbons, and metals to local water features and urbanization can cause reduced recharge to groundwater systems. As a result, the Lake Simcoe Protection Plan (2009) calls for improvements to the management of stormwater for both existing and future development with a goal to decrease phosphorous loadings and to minimize changes to the water balance. Improved urban stormwater management can be accomplished through several means including retrofitting existing development with low impact development (LID) and using LID for future development projects. As a direct result of the Plan, LID implementation has increased within the watershed in recent years.
Determining the most suitable locations for LID placement requires an understanding of the shallow subsurface including the geology and hydrogeology, as well as current land use and policy limitations. To help guide LID placement, the Shallow Subsurface Characterization Project aims to provide an improved understanding of the shallow subsurface through the development of a GIS layer that prioritizes possible locations for LID projects within the East Holland River subwatershed. The GIS layer has been developed using geologic and static water level data provided by the Regional Municipality of York and available through the Oak Ridges Moraine Groundwater Program.
Based on this improved understanding of the shallow subsurface environment, the final product is a single easy-to-use GIS layer that characterizes the watershed into areas that are deemed to be of low, medium, or high priority for LID placement. This will allow for a simple desktop evaluation of the most appropriate locations for LID retrofits, even for staff or members of the public that have limited hydrogeologic knowledge. The long term goal is for the layer to be available on the LSRCA website to municipalities, stormwater engineers, planners, students, and anyone interested in LID within the East Holland River subwatershed.
GEOSCAN ID313585