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TitleTransboundary groundwater issues within Canada and between Canada - US
AuthorRivera, A R
SourceWater Resources IMPACT .
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20180169
PublisherAmerican Water Resources Association
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
ProgramNational Aquifer Evaluation & Accounting, Groundwater Geoscience
AbstractCanada is a very large confederation composed of 13 different jurisdictions; each jurisdiction manages water resources separately. There are no legally binding agreements for the joint management of transboundary aquifers within Canadian or with the USA, but robust agreements for surface waters, rivers and lakes, within Canada and with the US exist. In a few cases, surface water agreements make provisions to include groundwater whenever groundwater may affect surface water.
Until now, however, no transboundary groundwater issues have been raised, and only very recent specific publications identifying transboundary aquifers in Canada have emerged; delineation is ongoing but transboundary aquifers assessment is still incipient.
The last decade has seen an emerging trend in Canada where institutions and organizations have been including groundwater in their plans more explicitly (research, management and governance). Strong science-based regulations are the preferred choice of most provinces for water management and governance. Public consultation, collaboration, shared management and governance are Canadian traits of applying a code of values and ethics in all aspects related with governance. Despite the scale and diversity of the country, and its highly decentralized government, Canada seems to be coming together as a country with the same (almost) water resources vision, management and governance. However, there is still no clear path towards shared transboundary management and governance, but the science specific for transboundary groundwater is adopted.
In this presentation, we will discuss the transboundary groundwater issues within Canada and between Canada and the United States with two specific cases. The Prairie Provinces in central Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba), which share four inter-basins and nine transboundary aquifers; and the Mackenzie Watershed in northern Canada, where three provinces and two territories (B.C, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Yukon and the Northern Territories) share the Mackenzie River Watershed and many tributaries, as well as three bedrock transboundary aquifers. We will close our presentation with a few arguments on the international transboundary aquifers as described in a recent overview paper by Rivera (2015).
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This presentation discusses the transboundary groundwater issues within Canada and between Canada and the United States with two specific cases. The Prairie Provinces in central Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba), which share four inter-basins and nine transboundary aquifers; and the Mackenzie Watershed in northern Canada, where three provinces and two territories (B.C, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Yukon and the Northern Territories) share the Mackenzie River Watershed and many tributaries, as well as three bedrock transboundary aquifers. The paper closes with a few arguments on the international transboundary aquifers as described in a recent overview paper by Rivera (2015).
GEOSCAN ID308488