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TitleTunnel detection using vibrating and impulsive seismic sources with a landstreamer
AuthorPugin, A J -M; Brewer, K; Cartwright, T; Sargent, S L
SourceSEG18, expanded abstracts and technical program; Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Technical Program, Expanded Abstracts 2018, 2018 p. 2667-2671, https://doi.org/10.1190/segam2018-2995013.1
Year2018
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20180021
PublisherSociety of Exploration Geophysicists
MeetingSEG 2018 Annual Meeting; Ahaheim, California; US; October 14-18, 2018
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
Subjectsgeophysics; surficial geology/geomorphology; engineering geology; geophysical surveys; seismic surveys, ground; seismic reflection surveys; seismic waves; marine sediments; marine clays; waste disposal; mines; coal mining; mines; in-field instrumentation; methodology; alluvial sediments
Illustrationsphotographs; seismic profiles
ProgramAquifer Assessment & support to mapping, Groundwater Geoscience
Released2018 01 01
Abstract(Summary)
We present the results of two surveys showing that shear wave seismic reflection can image a sewage tunnel buried at 17 m in marine clay, and coalmine tunnels close to the bedrock surface beneath about 30 m of recent fluvial sediments. The SH shear wave seismic reflection method provides outstanding diffraction features only visible with transverse horizontal sources and recording capacities (H2,H2). These data were acquired using an impulsive or a broader band vibrating source coupled with a landstreamer. The use of SV vertical shear and PP compressive waves extracted from data acquired with vertical vibrating source and receiver mode (V,V) did not give satisfying results for locating tunnels in these environments.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
We present the results of two surveys showing that shear wave seismic reflection can image a sewage tunnel buried at 17 m in marine clay, and coalmine tunnels close to the bedrock surface beneath about 30 m of recent fluvial sediments. The SH shear wave seismic reflection method provides outstanding diffraction features only visible with transverse horizontal sources and recording capacities (H2,H2). These data were acquired using an impulsive or a broader band vibrating source coupled with a landstreamer. The use of SV vertical shear and PP compressive waves extracted from data acquired with vertical vibrating source and receiver mode (V,V) did not give satisfying results for locating tunnels in these environments.
GEOSCAN ID308159