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TitleVariations of climate, surface energy budget and minimum snow/ice extent over Canadian Arctic landmass for 2000-2016
AuthorTrichtchenko, A P; Wang, S
SourceJournal of Climate vol. 31, p. 1155-1172, https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0198.1
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20170262
PublisherAmerican Meteorological Society
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNunavut; Northwest Territories; Yukon
AreaCanadian Arctic
Lat/Long WENS-140.0000 -56.0000 88.0000 60.0000
Subjectssea ice; ice sheets; icefields; ice; snow; remote sensing; MODIS; North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR); Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES); Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI); optical remote sensing; snow cover map
Illustrationslocation maps; satellite imagery; graphs; tables; histograms
ProgramRisk Analysis, Climate Change Geoscience
AbstractSnow and ice over land are important hydrological resources and sensitive indicators of climate change. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dataset at 250-m spatial resolution generated at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) is used to derive the annual minimum snow and ice (MSI) extent over the Canadian Arctic landmass over a 17-yr time span (2000-16). The smallest MSI extent (1.53 3 105 km2) was observed in 2012, the largest (2.09 3 105 km2) was observed in 2013; the average value
was 1.70 3 105 km2. Several reanalyses and observational datasets are assessed to explain the derived MSI variations: the ERA-Interim reanalysis, North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) radiative fluxes, and European Space Agency's GlobSnow dataset. Comparison with the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) showed two important facts: 1) the semipermanent snowpack in the Canadian Arctic that persists through the entire melting season is a significant component
relative to the ice caps and glacier-covered areas (up to 36% or 5.583104 km2), and 2) the MSI variations are related to variations in the local climate dynamics such as warm season average temperature, energy fluxes, and snow cover. The correlation coefficients (absolute values) can be as high as 0.77. The reanalysis-based MSI estimates agree with satellite MSI results (average bias of 2.2 3 103 km2 or 1.3% of the mean value).
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The snow and ice are important resources and sensitive indicators of climate change. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer dataset at 250m spatial resolution generated at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing is used to derive the annual minimum snow and ice extent over Canadian Arctic landmass over 2000-2016. The smallest value 1.53×105 km2 was observed in 2012, the largest 2.09×105 km2 was observed in 2013, the average value was 1.70×105 km2. Several re-analyses and other datasets are assessed to explain the derived variations. Analysis and comparison with the Randolph Glacier Inventory RGI 5.0 showed two important facts: 1) semi-permanent snowpack in Canadian Arctic which persists through the entire melting season is a significant component of MSI relative to the ice caps and glacier-covered areas (up to 38% or 58×103 km2); 2) the regional MSI anomalies over Canadian Arctic correlate well with the local climate dynamics such as warm season average temperature and energy flux anomalies. The correlation coefficients (absolute values) can be as high as 0.81.
GEOSCAN ID306183