GEOSCAN Search Results: Fastlink

GEOSCAN Menu


TitleDinoflagellates from the GEM project: aspects of Mesozoic-Cenozoic biostratigraphy from Canada's North
AuthorFensome, R A; Williams, G L
LinksOnline - En ligne (1.77 MB)
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20170220
Meeting11th International Conference on Modern and Fossil Dinoflagellates; Bordeaux; FA; July 17 -21, 2017
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNunavut; Northern offshore region
AreaAxel Heibeirg Island; Glacier Fjord; Baffin Island; Mackenzie River
Subjectspaleoenvironment; fossil assemblages; Oligosphaeridium; Odontochitina; areoligeracean
ProgramBaffin Petroleum Systems, GEM2: Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals
AbstractThe Geological Survey of Canada's Geoscience for Energy and Minerals (GEM) project is focussed on regions of northern Canada. Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks play a significant role in the geology and petroleum systems of several GEM regions of interest. Dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) are key to establishing the ages of many Jurassic through Neogene sections and in determining paleoenvironments. Our work is currently centred on the Baffin, Mackenzie, and Western Arctic regions. In the Baffin region, a focus is Bylot Island sections that encompass Albian¿Cenomanian to middle Paleocene (Selandian) rocks, previously dated using spores and pollen. The dinocyst assemblages are helping to refine age control and marine paleoenvironmental interpretations. Mesozoic rocks in the Mackenzie region form a central link between the better constrained strata of the Western Interior Seaway further south and coeval strata of the Western Arctic. Sections along the Hume River and Olympic River have yielded diverse Albian to possibly Turonian assemblages, allowing refinement of ages that may impact a broader area. The Hume River section has yielded a rich variety of areoligeracean dinocysts and is providing vital material for a taxonomic revision of Cyclonephelium and similar genera. In the Western Arctic, the dinocyst assemblages from the middle Cretaceous part of the Glacier Fiord section on Axel Heiberg Island contain primarily poorly preserved dinocyst assemblages dominated by Oligosphaeridium, Odontochitina and areoligeraceans. In combination with other data, these will help develop a better understanding of Cretaceous age control and paleoenvironments in the Canadian Arctic.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The Geological Survey of Canada's Geoscience for Energy and Minerals (GEM) project is focussed on regions of northern Canada. Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks play a significant role in the geology and petroleum systems of several GEM regions of interest. Dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) are key to establishing the ages of many Jurassic through Neogene sections and in determining paleoenvironments. We are currently using dinocysts to refine our understanding of Late Cretaceous - Paleogene sections on Bylot Island (Baffin region), the middle Cretaceous sections on the Mackenzie Plains (Mackenzie region), and middle Cretaceous sections on Axel Heiberg Island (Western Arctic region). An empohasis is to develop event stratigraphgic schemes for each region and also a TransArctic scheme that provides correlations between these northern regions.
GEOSCAN ID306050