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TitleDeveloping the bedrock layer for Canada 3-D: the Precambrian-Phanerozoic boundary
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Authorde Kemp, E A; Schetselaar, E M; Hillier, M; Montsion, R
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Scientific Presentation 65, 2017, 1 sheet, https://doi.org/10.4095/301671
Year2017
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceCanada; British Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectsstratigraphy; mathematical and computational geology; tectonostratigraphic zones; modelling; mapping techniques; bedrock geology; basement geology; drillholes; seismic data; seismic reflection surveys; seismic refraction surveys; geostatistics; unconformities; erosion; glaciation; deformation; crustal structure; structural features; faults; Phanerozoic-Precambrian Boundary; Hudson Bay Basin; Western Canada Sedimentary Basin; Williston Basin; Canadian Shield; Appalachian Orogen; Canadian Cordillera; Canada 3D; OneGeology; Lithoprobe; 3-D modelling; historical data; methodology; data processing; data quality; interpolation; extension; mine scale 3D modelling; Phanerozoic; Precambrian
Illustrationsgeoscientific sketch maps; 3-D models; photographs; histograms; schematic cross-sections; block diagrams; tables; flow diagrams; schematic representations
ProgramOpen Geoscience Initiative, Director General's Office of GSC Central and Northern Canada Branch
Image
Released2017 06 13
AbstractOne of the most significant tectonostratigraphic features of the geology of Canada is the boundary separating 'cover' rocks of the Phanerozoic Eon and older 'basement' rocks; dominantly metamorphic and crystalline rocks of the Precambrian shield. In the context of the Canada-3D initiative to develop a 3D geological model of Canada from the surface to the Moho, we have begun to integrate data constraints for modelling this boundary, including geological map, drillhole and seismic data. The 3D surface development is being undertaken through the application of data (geostatistical, implicit modelling (GOCAD/SKUA and SURFE) and knowledge (SPARSE) driven methods. More accurate 3D delineation of this key boundary will help support applications such as the separation of bulk rock properties into cover and basement classes which could in turn be used for geophysical and mineral potential modelling. Coupled with heat flow and fracture density estimates; it could also contribute to future development of national-scale 3D favourability maps for geothermal energy and CO2 sequestration potential. The project combines a large amount of data from various sources collected over the last 175 years since the initiation of geological mapping by the Geological Survey of Canada in 1842 by Sir William Logan.
The Precambrian-Phanerozoic boundary is dominantly an angular unconformity between the crystalline bedrock of the Canadian Shield and Phanerozoic sedimentary cover sequences, spanning a hiatus of several hundreds of millions to more than two billion years. In rare cases such as the Rapitan Group in the Mackenzie Mountains, it is a more conformable stratigraphic contact between Neoproterozoic and Cambrian formations. There are also many parts of Canada's subsurface which have no geologic record of the boundary where the crust is mainly composed of either younger Paleozoic and Mesozoic mobile belts (Central Newfoundland and British Columbia), or exposed basement of the Precambrian Shield. The geological data that constrain the Precambrian-Phanerozoic interval are spatially heterogeneous, and vary in quality from excellent observations from petroleum wells in the Western Canada and Williston Basins, to less reliable well logs in Southern Ontario, to interpretive map traces in the overburden covered Hudson Bay low lands. Seismic reflection and refraction data from Lithoprobe and industry surveys will support deeper interpretations of the boundary, and be integrated with constraints obtained by geological mapping in the more complex regions of the Canadian Cordillera and Appalachian orogens. Canada-3D is modelling other tectonostratigraphic features (crustal scale fault networks and major lithostratigraphic horizons) within the bedrock layer, above and below the Precambrian-Phanerozoic boundary, but by focusing early on this significant boundary we gain insight to the data distribution, the required methodology and processing gaps that exist tackling this problem at a national scale. As the project proceeds there will be a need for development of 3D tools to support uncertainty estimation, sparse data interpolation and extension, and interpretation workflows designed to cope with the many challenges presented by limited sampling of complex geologic terrains.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
One of the most significant tectonostratigraphic features of the geology of Canada is the boundary separating 'cover' rocks of the Phanerozoic Eon and older 'basement' rocks; dominantly metamorphic and crystalline rocks of the Precambrian shield. In the context of the Canada-3D initiative to develop a 3D geological model of Canada from the surface to the Moho, we have begun to integrate data constraints for modelling this boundary, including geological map, drillhole and seismic data. This project will help support applications such as the separation of bulk rock properties into cover and basement classes which could in turn be used for geophysical modelling, heat flow and fracture density estimates, 3D favourability maps for geothermal energy and CO2 sequestration potential. The project combines a large amount of data from various sources collected over the last 175 years since the initiation of geological mapping by the Geological Survey of Canada in 1842 by Sir William Logan.
GEOSCAN ID301671