GEOSCAN Search Results: Fastlink

GEOSCAN Menu


TitleImproving the spatial density of a regional hydraulic conductivity dataset with estimates made from domestic water well information
DownloadFree download (whole publication) (pdf 1047 KB)
AuthorPriebe, E H; Neville, C J; Rudolph, D L
SourceRegional-scale groundwater geoscience in southern Ontario: an Ontario Geological Survey and Geological Survey of Canada groundwater geoscience open house; by Russell, H A J; Ford, D; Priebe, E H; Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 8212, 2017 p. 29, https://doi.org/10.4095/299796
Year2017
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
MeetingOntario Geological Survey and Geological Survey of Canada groundwater geoscience open house; Guelph; CA; March 1-2, 2017
Documentopen file
Lang.English
RelatedThis publication is contained in Russell, H A J; Ford, D; Priebe, E H; (2017). Regional-scale groundwater geoscience in southern Ontario: an Ontario Geological Survey and Geological Survey of Canada groundwater geoscience open house, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 8212
Subjectshydrogeology; groundwater; groundwater resources; aquifers; groundwater resources; resource management; exploration methods; hydraulic conductivity; water wells; specific capacity; datasets; drawdown
Viewing
Location
 
Natural Resources Canada Library - Ottawa (Earth Sciences)
 
Released2017 02 22
AbstractHigh-quality hydraulic conductivity data tend to be sparse relative to the large areas under investigation in regional-scale groundwater studies. From the 1960s through the 1990s, the literature is replete with articles discussing the details of augmenting high-quality hydraulic conductivity datasets with values estimated from specific capacity tests. Early publications focused on the development of the fundamental mathematical relation between specific capacity and hydraulic conductivity. Later articles presented approaches claiming improved accuracy of hydraulic conductivity estimates from specific capacity by correcting for additional well losses. However, because the site-specific data required to correct for additional well losses are generally not available, these corrections often led to error. Through the 1990s, many workers abandoned the analytical approach for an empirical one, arguing that correcting for additional well losses introduces significant error into the K estimate. Since the early 2000s, the literature has become largely silent on the topic of augmenting high-quality hydraulic conductivity datasets with K estimates developed from specific capacity.
Despite a pause in the literature, integration of the results of high-quality tests within more approximate but spatially extensive datasets is still desired, particularly to support the identification of groundwater resource exploration targets in complex, heterogeneous geological settings. We present a simple and effective approach to synthesize the results from high-quality hydraulic tests with reconnaissance-level hydraulic conductivity estimates made from domestic water well specific capacity tests. Domestic water wells are ubiquitous across Ontario, and although their associated well records do not contain the information required to support rigorous hydraulic test analyses, they do contain the information required to calculate specific capacity. We use the fundamental Theis relation to make hydraulic conductivity estimates from specific capacity tests, assuming that additional well losses account for a relatively small portion of the total observed drawdown. The utility of this approach is demonstrated with data comparisons at three different spatial scales. Each comparison is conducted to evaluate the suitability of augmenting the high-quality data set with lesser quality estimates to answer specific research questions. The results of the comparisons results show good correlation between both sets of hydraulic conductivity estimates, and provide the information required to support careful data integration for improved hydraulic conductivity data coverage.
GEOSCAN ID299796