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TitleUnderstanding permafrost conditions through integration of local and traditional observations and geoscience data in the region of Rankin Inlet, Nunavut
AuthorLeBlanc, A -M; Bellehumeur-Genier, O; Oldenborger, G; Tremblay, T
SourceSummary of activities; Canada-Nunavut Geoscience Office, Summary of Activities .
LinksOnline - En ligne
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20160210
PublisherCanada-Nunavut Geoscience Office
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNunavut
NTS55J; 55K; 55N; 55O
AreaRankin Inlet
Lat/Long WENS -92.6667 -91.6667 63.0667 62.8000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; permafrost; mapping techniques; subsidence; thermokarst; glacial lakes; water levels; freezing ground; ground ice; ground temperatures; DInSAR; active layer detachment; frost-creep slopes; gelifluction lobes; ground thermal regime
Illustrationstables; graphs; photographs; satellite images
ProgramLand-based Infrastructure, Climate Change Geoscience
AbstractThis report follows a mapping workshop held in Rankin Inlet in February 2016 that focused on collecting local and traditional observations on permafrost in the region. A field campaign was held in August 2016 in order to visit areas of interests identified by the workshop participants. The workshop and field observations were combined with geoscience data in a multidisciplinary approach to characterize permafrost in the area. Geoscience data presented in this report include DinSAR imagery, historic water levels and climate records. Our analysis shows that surficial geology of undifferentiated till and marine sediments along with nearshore marine sediments exhibit greatest subsidence based on the DinSAR mapping and thus have a higher potential for ground ice content. We determine that all water bodies experience inter-decennial surface area variability, but large (>14000 m2) and small (>3500 m2) water bodies exhibit the highest occurrence of growth. Visits to workshop observation sites led to the validation of the occurrence of various permafrost related features or phenomenon that give important insight into ground conditions and the relationship to the surficial geology.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This report follows a mapping workshop held in Rankin Inlet in February 2016 that focused on collecting local and traditional observations on permafrost in the region. A field campaign was held in August 2016 in order to visit areas of interests identified by the workshop participants. The workshop and field observations were combined with geoscience data in a multidisciplinary approach to characterize permafrost in the area. Geoscience data presented in this report include satellite images, historic water levels and climate records. Our analysis shows that ground ice content may depend on local surficial. We determine that all water bodies experience inter-decennial surface area variability, but large (>14000 m2) and small (>3500 m2) water bodies exhibit the highest occurrence of growth. Visits to workshop observation sites led to the validation of the occurrence of various permafrost related features and phenomenon that give important insight into ground conditions and the relationship to the surficial geology.
GEOSCAN ID299312