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TitleSolar eclipse as a source of satellite image contamination in multi-scene clear-sky composites
AuthorTrishchenko, A P; Ungureanu, C
SourceCanadian Journal of Remote Sensing vol. 42, 2016 p. 730-738, https://doi.org/10.1080/07038992.2016.1249563
Year2016
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20160171
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
Subjectsextraterrestrial geology; eclipses, solar; satellites; satellite imagery; reflectance
Illustrationsdiagrams; formulae; satellite images
ProgramRisk Analysis, Climate Change Geoscience
AbstractThe solar eclipse is a relatively rare event, but it could cause significant impact on satellite products if not accounted for properly. The solar eclipse effect on daily and 10-day clear-sky composites is described here. It is shown that the standard scene identification and compositing algorithm developed at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery fails to identify pixels affected by a solar eclipse. As a result, the solareclipse-affected imagery is almost entirely included in the composite product. A similar effect is observed in the standard NASA MOD09/MYD09 daily composite reflectance products. We describe here the details of the eclipse-affected imagery, the reason why clear-sky compositing criteria failed, and propose some modifications to the standard algorithm, such as reflectance normalization and scene identification procedures, to overcome the solar eclipse contamination problem in multiscene image composites.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The solar eclipse is a relatively rare event, but it may cause significant impact on satellite products if not accounted for properly. The solar eclipse effect on daily and 10-day clear-sky composites is described here. It is shown that the standard scene-identification and compositing algorithm developed at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery fails to identify pixels affected by a solar eclipse. As a result, the solar eclipse affected imagery is almost entirely included in the composite product. A similar effect is observed in the standard NASA MOD09/MYD09 daily composite reflectance products. We describe here the details of the eclipse-affected imagery, the reason why clear-sky compositing criteria failed, and propose some modifications to the standard algorithm, such as reflectance normalization and scene identification procedures, to overcome the solar eclipse contamination problem in multi-scene image composites.
GEOSCAN ID299225