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TitleGround control point acquisition for Acadia Forest, New Brunswick, during winter 2016, in support of Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation snow depth from unmanned aerial vehicule activities.
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AuthorPrévost, C; Fernandes, R; Canisius, F
SourceGeomatics Canada, Open File 27, 2016, 42 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/299101 (Open Access)
Year2016
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentopen file
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNew Brunswick
NTS21G/16
AreaAcadia Forest; Oromocto; Fredericton
Lat/Long WENS -66.3286 -66.3244 57.9333 45.9686
Lat/Long WENS -66.3244 -66.3244 57.9333 45.9686
Subjectsgeophysics; snow; analytical methods; remote sensing; global positioning system surveys; unmanned aerial vehicles; drones
Illustrationslocation maps; tables; photographs; aerial photographs
ProgramLand Surface Characterization, Remote Sensing Science
Released2016 09 21
AbstractNatural Resources Canada has the mandate of providing essential geographic information. An improved knowledge of our physical environment represents one of the basis of this mandate. This knowledge is generally associated with the environment as it appears in summer. However, snow cover is present over most of Canada for a varying period of time during the year. Managers, engineers and researchers require up to date information with regard to snow: Its coverage, depth and water content. These elements are difficult to accurately measure and any initiative in this area must use a stepwise approach; mapping the snow surface extent, and monitoring of snow melt being the first steps of this process. Flood monitoring / forecasting practitioners also require up to date information about snow cover, specifically in the spring season.
For the last few years, versatile and low cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's), also called drones, allow for multitemporal aerial surveys of snow cover to extract various representations of the snow extent. To obtain products geographically located with precision, it is required to establish ground control points (reference points) which are visible to the UAV camera, and for which geographic location is known with precision. To fulfill this need, a high precision Global Positioning System (GPS) survey is required.
A case study was undertaken in a test site of a few tens of hectares located in the Acadia Forest near Fredericton, New Brunswick. This document describes in detail the method and results of the GPS survey required for the geographic rectification of the numerous photographs acquired by the UAV's within the scope of this project.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Canadians live with snow cover for a varying period of time during the year. Managers, engineers and researchers require up-to-date snow information such as coverage, depth and water content. These elements can be quite difficult to accurately measure. A stepwise approach is recommend, focusing on snow surface, and monitoring of snow melt. For the last few years, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV-drone)can be used for multi-temporal aerial surveys of snow cover. To generate accurate geographically located UAV-derived products, a high precision GPS survey of the field site is required prior to UAV data collection. Precise geographically known reference points (ground control points) are marked in the field and located in the UAV imagery during geo-correction processing. A case study was completed in a test site located in the Acadia forest near Fredericton, NB. This document describes in detail the method and results of the GPS survey used for the geographic rectification of numerous photographs acquired by the UAV within the scope of this project.
GEOSCAN ID299101