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TitleThe variety and distribution of submarine glacial landforms and implications for ice-sheet reconstruction
AuthorDowdeswell, J A; Canals, M; Jakobsson, M; Todd, B J; Dowdeswell, E K; Hogan, K A
SourceAtlas of submarine glacial landforms: modern, Quaternary and ancient; by Dowdeswell, J A (ed.); Canals, M (ed.); Jakobsson, M (ed.); Todd, B J (ed.); Dowdeswell, E K (ed.); Hogan, K A (ed.); Geological Society Memoir no. 46, 2016 p. 519-552, https://doi.org/10.1144/M46.183
Year2016
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20160113
PublisherGeological Society of London
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
AreaAntarctica; Norway; Canada; Greenland
Lat/Long WENS-140.0000 160.0000 -45.0000 -80.0000
Lat/Long WENS -80.0000 -52.0000 75.0000 40.0000
Lat/Long WENS -40.0000 40.0000 84.0000 40.0000
Subjectssubglacial landforms; seafloor features; glacimarine processes; multibeam echo sounding; worldwide distribution; ice flow reconstruction; Quaternary
Illustrationslocation maps; bathymetric profiles; tables; photographs; digital elevation models; plots
ProgramMarine Geohazards, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractGlacimarine processes affect about 20% of the global ocean today, and this area expanded considerably under cyclical full-glacial conditions during the Quaternary (Fig. 1) (Dowdeswell et al. 2016b). Many of the submarine landforms produced at the base and margin of past ice sheets remain well preserved on the seafloor in fjords and on high-latitude continental shelves after the retreat of the ice that produced them. These glacial landforms, protected from subaerial erosion and beneath wave-base and tidal currents in water that is often hundreds of metres deep, are gradually buried by both hemipelagic and glacimarine sedimentation; they may be preserved over long periods in the geological record if palaeo-continental shelves are not reworked by subsequent glacier advances or bottom currents (Dowdeswell et al. 2007). This means that, first, submarine glacial landforms can be observed at or close to the modern seafloor after retreat of the last great ice sheets from their most recent Quaternary maximum about 18-20 000 years ago using swath-bathymetric mapping systems and, secondly, buried glacial landforms may also be identified and examined within glacial-sedimentary sequences from Quaternary and earlier ice ages using seismic-reflection methods.
The development of multibeam echo sounding over the past two decades, coupled with high-accuracy GPS positioning, has allowed morphological mapping of the seafloor at an unprecedented level of detail. In this paper, the variety of submarine glacial landforms observed in modern, Quaternary and more ancient sediments is described. Landforms produced subglacially, those formed at and beyond...
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Glacimarine processes affect about 20% of the global ocean today, and this area almost doubled under cyclical full-glacial conditions during the Quaternary. Many of the submarine landforms produced at the base and margin of past ice sheets remain well preserved on the seafloor in fjords and on high-latitude continental shelves after the retreat of the ice that produced them. These glacial landforms may be preserved over long periods in the geological record if palaeo-continental shelves are not reworked by subsequent glacier advances or bottom currents. This means that submarine glacial landforms can be observed, first, at or close to the modern seafloor after retreat of the last great ice sheets from their most recent Quaternary maximum about 18¿20,000 years ago using swath-bathymetric mapping systems and, secondly, buried glacial landforms may also be identified and examined within glacial-sedimentary sequences from Quaternary and earlier Ice Ages using seismic-reflection methods.
GEOSCAN ID299019