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TitleTechnical meeting on the traffic light protocols (TLP) for induced seismicity: summary and recommendations
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AuthorKao, H; Eaton, D W; Atkinson, G M; Maxwell, S; Babaie Mahani, A
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Open File 8075, 2016, 20 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/299002
Year2016
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
MeetingTechnical Meeting on the Traffic Light Protocols (TLP) for Induced Seismicity; Calgary; CA; October 6, 2015
Documentopen file
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
Subjectsgeophysics; seismicity; seismic interpretations; seismic risk; structural features; geological hazards
Illustrationsscreen captures; pie charts
ProgramShale Gas - induced seismicity, Environmental Geoscience
Released2016 08 16
AbstractA technical meeting was held on October 6, 2015, at the downtown campus of the University of Calgary to discuss the effectiveness of the traffic light protocol (TLP) approach for management of risks from induced seismicity. The meeting was attended by 64 participants from industry (55%), various government agencies (25%), academia (10%), and professional societies (5%). The role of TLP in the mitigation of seismic hazards from induced seismicity and its challenges were examined. Three major issues with the current magnitude-based TLPs were identified: (1) possible confusion due to the magnitude uncertainty for an induced seismic event, (2) lack of a link to the impact/consequences of reported seismic event(s), and (3) need to integrate other potential hazard indicators. To improve the effectiveness of existing TLPs, the following changes are recommended: (1) incorporate ground motion information into TLPs such that decisions can be made based on better assessment of the actual risk, (2) develop a standardized approach for earthquake magnitude calculation, and (3) make the TLPs more adaptive to local hazard conditions through research and incorporation (as appropriate) of other hazard indicators. A number of action items were brought forward at the workshop: (1) establishing a uniform standard for seismic data collection and assessment, (2) establishing a coherent framework of data sharing for induced seismicity monitoring and research, (3) sharing other types of data, such as locations of known faults, and (4) taking more proactive approaches to establish best practices and to mitigate seismic risk from induced seismicity. These actions will greatly strengthen the reputation of the hydrocarbon industry with respect to proactive, sensitive and responsible development of unconventional sources. If these steps can be implemented in a timely and effective manner, Canada has the potential to be a world leader in monitoring, understanding and mitigating hazards and risks from injection-induced seismicity.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
A technical meeting was held on October 6, 2015, at the downtown campus of the University of Calgary to discuss the effectiveness of the traffic light protocol (TLP) for induced seismicity. The meeting had a total of 64 participants from the industry (55%), various government agencies (25%), academia (10%), and professional societies (5%). The role of TLP in the mitigation of seismic hazards from induced seismicity and its challenges were examined. Three major deficiencies of the current TLPs were identified. To effectively improve the current TLPs, it was recommended to (1) incorporate ground motion information into TLPs such that decisions can be made based on better assessment of the actual risk, (2) standardize earthquake magnitude calculation, and (3) make the TLPs more adaptive to local hazard conditions. A number of action items were also raised to set a path forward.
GEOSCAN ID299002