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TitleCoastal changes in the Arctic
AuthorOverduin, P P; Strzelecki, M C; Grigoriev, M N; Couture, N; Lantuit, H; St-Hilaire-Gravel, D; Günther, F; Wetterich, S
SourceSedimentary coastal zones from high to low latitudes: similarities and differences; by Martini, I P (ed.); Wanless, H R (ed.); Geological Society, Special Publication 388, 2014 p. 1-28, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP388.13
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150385
PublisherGeological Society of London
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNorthwest Territories; Nunavut; Yukon; Northern offshore region
NTS16; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 105; 106; 107; 115; 116; 117
AreaArctic; Canada; United States; Russian Federation; Greenland
Lat/Long WENS-180.0000 180.0000 90.0000 60.0000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; marine geology; coastal environment; coastal studies; coastal management; permafrost; ground ice; freezing ground; ground temperatures; climate, arctic; arctic geology; climatic fluctuations; climate
Illustrationslocation maps; tables; photographs; plots
ProgramCoastal Infrastructure, Climate Change Geoscience
AbstractThe Arctic's climate system is changing: air temperatures, major river discharges and open water season length have increased, and storm intensities and tracks are changing. Thirteen quantitative studies of the rates of coastline position change throughout the Arctic show that recently observed changes have not increased coastal erosion rates, which currently range between 0 and 2 m/yr when averaged for the arctic shelf seas. Current data is probably insufficient, both spatially and temporally, however, to capture change at decadal to sub-decadal time scales. In this context, we describe the current understanding of arctic coastal geomorphodynamics with an emphasis on erosional regimes of coasts with ice-rich sedimentary deposits in the Laptev, East Siberian and Beaufort seas, where local coastal erosion can reach 30 m/yr. We also examine coasts with lithified (rocky) substrates where geomorphodynamics are intensified by rapid glacial retreat. Coastlines of Svalbard, Greenland, and the Canadian Archipelago are less frequently studied than ice-rich continental coasts of North America and Siberia and studies often focus on coastal sections composed of unlithified material. As air temperature and sea ice duration and extent change, longer thaw and wave seasons will intensify coastal dynamics in the Arctic.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The Arctic's climate system is changing: there have been increases in air temperatures, the discharge of major rivers, and the length of the open-water season, as well as changes in storminess. Thirteen studies of erosion throughout the Arctic show that the rates of coastal erosion (between 0 and 2 m/yr) have not increased as a result of these changes, but current data is probably insufficient, both spatially and temporally, to capture change at decadal or shorter time scales. This article describes our current understanding of the dynamics of arctic coasts, with an emphasis on ice-rich coasts in the Laptev, East Siberian and Beaufort seas, where local coastal erosion can reach 30 m/yr. We also examine rocky coasts of Svalbard, Greenland, and the Canadian Archipelago, where the dynamics are intensified by rapid glacial retreat. As air temperature and sea ice change, longer thaw and open water seasons will intensify coastal dynamics in the Arctic.
GEOSCAN ID297500