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TitleHow scientists' communications helped mitigate the psychosocial effects of the October 2012 magnitude 7.8 earthquake near Haida Gwaii, Canada
AuthorBird, A; Lamontagne, M
SourceSeismological Research Letters vol. 86, no. 5, 2015 p. 1301-1309, https://doi.org/10.1785/0220140231
Year2015
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150347
PublisherInternational Union of Geodesy and Geophysics
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Western offshore region
NTS103B; 103C; 103F; 103G/13; 103J/04; 103K/01; 103K/02; 103K/03
AreaHaida Gwaii
Lat/Long WENS-134.0000 -130.2500 54.2500 51.5000
Subjectsgeophysics; earthquakes; earthquake studies; earthquake magnitudes; earthquake risk
Illustrationslocation maps; plots
ProgramWestern Canada Geohazards Project, Public Safety Geoscience
Abstract(unpublished)
On 27th October 2012, the sparsely populated region of Haida Gwaii (formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands), Canada, was struck by a magnitude 7.8 earthquake. The second largest recorded earthquake in Canada's written history, it was felt throughout the western province of British Columbia and into neighbouring provinces, territories and states, as far as 1600 km from the event's rupture zone. Throughout the islands of Haida Gwaii, the perceivable shaking lasted 1.5 - 2 minutes, with about 30 seconds of very strong shaking. Despite there being relatively light building damage and few, minor injuries, many of the roughly 4,500 inhabitants of Haida Gwaii found the earthquake and its numerous aftershocks to be a truly unsettling experience. Through community meetings and face-to-face interaction, we endeavoured to mitigate the earthquakes' psycho-social impacts, in conjunction with a field survey. Myths and misconceptions on earthquakes and tsunami were addressed whenever possible. We anticipate that lessons learned from our experiences might be applied to response to future significant geohazard events.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The October 2012, magnitude 7.8 earthquake which struck the sparsely populated region of Haida Gwaii was the second largest recorded earthquake in Canada's written history; it was felt throughout the western province of British Columbia and into neighbouring provinces, territories and states, as far as 1600 km from the event's rupture zone. Throughout the islands of Haida Gwaii, the perceivable shaking lasted 1.5 - 2 minutes, with about 30 seconds of very strong shaking. Despite there being relatively light building damage and few, minor injuries, many of the roughly 4,500 inhabitants of Haida Gwaii found the earthquake and its numerous aftershocks to be a truly unsettling experience. Through community meetings and face-to-face interaction, we endeavoured to mitigate the earthquakes' psycho-social impacts, in conjunction with a field survey. Myths and misconceptions on earthquakes and tsunami were addressed whenever possible. We anticipate that lessons learned from our experiences might be applied to response to future significant geohazard events.
GEOSCAN ID297421