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TitleReconnaissance geological mapping, stratigraphy and magnetotelluric survey of northern Brock Inlier, Northwest Territories
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AuthorRainbird, R H; Craven, J A; Turner, E C; Jackson, V A; Fischer, B J; Bouchard, M; Greenman, J W; Gibson, T
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Open File 7955, 2015, 16 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/297296
Year2015
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentopen file
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNorthwest Territories
NTS97A; 97D
AreaBrock Inlier; Brock River
Lat/Long WENS-124.0000 -120.5000 69.7500 68.2500
Subjectseconomic geology; stratigraphy; sedimentology; structural geology; mineral potential; depositional environment; depositional history; mineralization; sedimentary rocks; tectonostratigraphic zones; lithofacies; magnetotelluric surveys; magnetotelluric interpretations; sandstones; bedrock geology; Mikkelsen Islands Formation; Nelson Head Formation; Precambrian; Proterozoic
Illustrationslocation maps; stratigraphic columns
ProgramMackenzie Corridor, Shield to Selwyn, GEM2: Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals
Released2015 11 20
Abstract(Summary)
Natural Resources Canada's Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals (GEM) program is laying the foundation for sustainable economic development in Canada's north through improved, publically available, geoscience knowledge and mapping of this vast region. As part of the second phase of this program, Rob Rainbird, Valerie Jackson and Elizabeth Turner are leading studies involving detailed stratigraphic (sedimentary rock layer) analyses and bedrock geological mapping of early Neoproterozoic (1,000- to 800 million-year-old) and lower Paleozoic (540-400 million-year-old) sedimentary rocks with mineral resource potential and limited geological information. Their project focuses on the Brock Inlier, an uplifted region of mostly Proterozoic sedimentary rocks surrounded by younger sedimentary rocks, located just east of Darnley Bay, Northwest Territories. The Brock Inlier is also purported to host the largest gravity and magnetic anomaly (deviation from an expected background reading in geophysical measurements) detected in North America, which indicates dense rocks below the surface that may contain metals. Jim Craven is leading a magnetotelluric (MT) geophysical study to trace sedimentary rock layers westward from the Brock Inlier into the subsurface. A related goal of the MT work is to improve our understanding of the nature, size and depth of the Darnley Bay anomaly. The research team uses high-resolution satellite imagery, photographs, and ground-truthing (verifying, in-person, what is seen on imagery) to learn about the spatial extent and composition of rock units. During August 2015 field work in Brock Inlier, the research team examined excellent exposures of mainly carbonate rocks along the Hornaday River (see frontispiece), which is allowing them to learn more about a warm, shallow sea that occupied this area and the broader region nearly a billion years ago. They also studied younger rock units along the lower reaches of the river that include significant deposits of coal. They will use data from this project to produce modern, Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) open file maps, reports, and other technical research publications. The results of these ongoing studies will inform the resource industry, scientific community, and public, as well as provide a geological context for the distinct river canyons that draw visitors to Tuktut Nogait National Park.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Our team is involved in detailed stratigraphic analyses and geological mapping of Late Precambrian and lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks with mineral resource potential and limited geological information. Work focuses on the Brock Inlier, an uplifted area just east of Darnley Bay, Northwest Territories. We are also conducting a magnetotelluric geophysical study to trace sedimentary rock layers westward from the Brock Inlier into the subsurface. An underlying goal of the MT work is to improve our understanding of the nature, size and depth of the Darnley Bay anomaly. The research team uses high-resolution satellite imagery, photographs, and ground-truthing to learn about the spatial extent and composition of rock units. During August 2015 field work in Brock Inlier, the research team examined excellent exposures of mainly carbonate rocks along the Hornaday River, which is allowing them to learn more about a warm, shallow sea that occupied this area and the broader region nearly a billion years ago.
GEOSCAN ID297296