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TitleCyclic steps on a glacifluvial delta, Howe Sound, British Columbia
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AuthorStacey, C D; Hill, P R
SourceAtlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient; by Dowdeswell, J A; Canals, M; Jakobsson, M; Todd, B J; Dowdeswell, E K; Hogan, K A; Geological Society Memoir no. 46, 2016 p. 93-94, https://doi.org/10.1144/m46.71
Year2016
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150263
PublisherThe Geological Society of London (London)
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia
NTS92G/06; 92G/11
AreaHowe Sound; Squamish
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; turbidity currents; deltaic sediments; deltas; submarine features; deltaic deposits; turbidites; glaciofluvial deposits; Squamish River
Illustrationslocation maps; digital elevation models; graphs
ProgramMarine Geohazards, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractHowe Sound is a deep, steep-walled fjord on Canada's west coast. The primary sediment source is the glacially fed Squamish River. In the inner fjord, turbidity currents flow from the sandy Squamish River Delta at the fjord head reaching as far as the Porteau Creek Sill 15 km to the south. Recent observations from the Squamish Delta have shown that turbidity currents of various volumes are generated daily throughout almost a month of the summer meltwater period and flow through very active submarine channels characterized by active upstream-migrating cyclic step bedforms (Hughes Clarke et al. 2012a). Cyclic step bedforms are observed in other turbidity-current environments including the Fraser Delta (Hill 2012; Lintern et al. 2016) and Monterey Canyon (Fildani et al. 2006).
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Howe Sound is a deep, steep-walled fjord on Canada's west coast. The primary sediment source is the glacially fed Squamish River. In the inner fjord, turbidity currents flow from the sandy Squamish River delta at the fjord head reaching as far as the Porteau Creek Sill 15 km to the south. The Squamish River delta produces turbidity currents that occur on a daily basis during the summer freshet which flow through very active submarine channels. Step-like structures called cyclic steps migrate upslope on the channel floor and have also been identified on the unchannelized seafloor 3.5 km away from the delta. Cyclic step migration occurs during turbidity current activity and has been linked to landslide and river flood events on the Squamish Delta.
GEOSCAN ID297034