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TitleMethods and tools for natural hazard risk analysis in eastern Canada: Using knowledge to understand vulnerability and implement mitigation measures
AuthorNastev, M N; Nollet, M J N; Abo El Ezz, A A; Smirnoff, A S; Ploeger, K S P; McGrath, H M; Sawada, M S; Stefanakis, E S; Parent, M
SourceNatural Hazards vol. 18, issue 1, 2017., https://doi.org/10.1061/(asce)nh.1527-6996.0000209
Year2017
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150247
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper
File formatpdf
NTS21L; 31I
AreaSt. Lawrence lowlands
Lat/Long WENS -76.0000 -70.0000 47.0000 45.0000
SubjectsNature and Environment; Processes; Science and Technology; tectonics; Health and Safety; Government and Politics; health hazards; earthquakes; earthquake risk; floods; risk scenarios; government politics
Illustrationslocation maps; tables; graphs; photographs
ProgramQuantitave risk assessment project, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractWhile Canada is exposed to a variety of natural hazards, most risk and emergency managers presently lack the necessary tools and guidance to adequately undertake rigorous risk assessments. Unlike the complex computer models for natural hazard risk assessment intended for use by a small number of technical experts, user-friendly rapid risk assessment tools are being developed to allow non-expert users from the public safety community to run otherwise complex risk scenarios at a ¿press of a button¿. This paper reports on the roles and responsibilities of different levels of government in Canada. A part of the ongoing activities carried out jointly by the government and academia in Eastern Canada on the development of inventory and seismic and flood risk analysis tools is discussed, and examples at urban scales for Ottawa, Gatineau, Quebec City and Fredericton are given.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
While Canada is exposed to a variety of natural hazards, most risk and emergency managers presently lack the necessary tools and guidance to adequately undertake rigorous risk assessments. Unlike the complex computer models for natural hazard risk assessment intended for use by a small number of technical experts, user-friendly rapid risk assessment tools are being developed to allow non-expert users from the public safety community to run otherwise complex risk scenarios at a ¿press of a button¿. This paper reports on the roles and responsibilities of different levels of government in Canada. A part of the ongoing activities carried out jointly by the government and academia in Eastern Canada on the development of inventory and seismic and flood risk analysis tools is discussed, and examples at urban scales for Ottawa, Gatineau, Quebec City and Fredericton are given.
GEOSCAN ID296981