GEOSCAN Search Results: Fastlink

GEOSCAN Menu


TitleDInSAR seasonal surface displacement in built and natural permafrost environments, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada
AuthorLeBlanc, A -M; Short, N; Mathon-Dufour, V; Allard, M; Tremblay, T; Oldenborger, G A; Chartrand, J
SourceProceedings of GEOQuébec 2015; 2015 p. 1-8
Year2015
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150182
PublisherGeoQuebec
MeetingGEOQuébec 2015; Québec; CA; September 20-23, 2015
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNunavut
NTS25N/15
AreaIqaluit
Lat/Long WENS-68.5333 -68.4333 63.7833 63.7500
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; permafrost; ground ice; freezing ground; remote sensing; satellite imagery; climate, arctic; climate; DiSAR; RADARSAT-2; Cenozoic; Quaternary
Illustrationslocation maps; satellite images; histograms; tables
ProgramLand-based Infrastructure, Climate Change Geoscience
LinksOnline - En ligne
AbstractThree consecutive years of seasonal surface displacement over Iqaluit, Nunavut, were derived using Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR). Results show that low displacement is associated with bedrock and coarse sediments. Finer sediments, more likely to be ice-rich, show higher values of displacement. In addition to ground ice, other factors such as surficial fine-scale deposits and water at the surface and within the active layer can be the cause of displacement patterns. For a given surficial geology unit, displacements were generally lower in built areas than in the natural environment. One DInSAR season could be used to identify difficult terrain for construction. However, more than one season helps to differentiate between different causes of displacement. Findings are useful to guide DInSAR applications especially for infrastructure management and planning.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Satellite radar data (Radarsat-2) can be carefully processed to reveal movement of the ground in permafrost areas. These movements (settlement) provide a way to identify difficult terrains for construction. Three consecutive years of seasonal surface displacement over Iqaluit, Nunavut, were derived from satellite radar data. This paper uses the surficial geology units, permafrost and climatic data to interpret the results for built and natural terrains. Results are showing that: 1) surficial geology and ground ice are essential information to interpret the remote sensing results (satellite radar data), 2) thaw-sensitive soils and/or difficult terrain for construction can be identify with only one season, 3) but, more than one season will help to differentiate between different causes of displacement, and 4) displacements were generally lower in built areas than in the natural environment. Findings can be used to guide applications using satellite radar data, especially for infrastructure management and planning.
GEOSCAN ID296877