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TitleFifty years of surficial marine geoscience for canadians: a scientist's view
AuthorPiper, D J W
Source 2014 p. 211-214
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150171
PublisherBIO Oceans Association
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceOffshore region
Subjectseconomic geology; fossil fuels; hydrogeology; marine geology; sedimentology; surficial geology/geomorphology; oceanography; bathymetry; petroleum; mapping techniques; sedimentation; sediments; sedimentary environment; petroleum exploration; petroleum resources; basin analysis
Illustrationstables
ProgramPublic Safety Geoscience - Coordination, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractCanada's seas and oceans, once the claim under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea is accepted, will make up more than 42% of the Canadian territory. Canada has by far the longest coastline in the world. Mapping and understanding the geology of this vast marine area is about 100 years behind the analogous process on land. Despite 50 years of work by the Bedford Institute of Oceanography (BIO), almost all of the marine area north of 50°N off eastern and northern Canada is known only at a reconnaissance level, the way that much of the Canadian land territory was known in 1912. A six-pronged strategy for acquiring geological knowledge served BIO well over the past 50 years and with adaptations is suitable for the next 50 years. The key elements of this strategy are: (1) detailed geological mapping in relatively small important areas that serve as case studies, (2) regional reconnaissance surveys to assess variability away from the case studies, (3) monitoring and study of processes active at the sea-floor and their influence on seafloor geology, (4) development and application of scientific concepts that help to predict geological conditions in areas where data are sparse or absent, (5) continual technological development, and (6) archiving data and samples collected at great expense. Examples of how these approaches are intertwined and yielded past successes are given in this contribution and in other reviews in this volume. They also serve as a guide to the way ahead.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Canada's seas and oceans, once the claim under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea is accepted, will make up more than 42% of the Canadian territory. Canada has by far the longest coastline in the world. Mapping and understanding the geology of this vast marine area is about 100 years behind the analogous process on land. The key elements of a strategy for understanding this marine territory, that served well for the last 50 years are: (1) detailed geological mapping in relatively small important areas that serve as case studies, (2) regional reconnaissance surveys to assess variability away from the case studies, (3) monitoring and study of processes active at the sea-floor and their influence on seafloor geology, (4) development and application of scientific concepts that help to predict geological conditions in areas where data are sparse or absent, (5) continual technological development, and (6) archiving data and samples collected at great expense.
GEOSCAN ID296864