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TitlePermafrost in mountainous regions of Canada
AuthorGruber, S; Burn, C R; Arenson, L; Geertsema, M; Harris, S; Smith, S; Bonnaventure, P; Benkert, B
SourceProceedings of GEOQuébec2015, 68th Canadian Geotechnical Conference and 7th Canadian Permafrost Conference; 2015, 8 pages
Year2015
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150106
PublisherCanadian Geotechnical Society
MeetingGEOQuébec2015, 68th Canadian Geotechnical Conference and 7th Canadian Permafrost Conference; Québec; CA; September 20-23, 2015
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceCanada; British Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
AreaMountainous regions
Subjectsgeneral geology; hydrogeology; permafrost; debris flows; groundwater; water quality; ecosystems; rock falls; avalanches
Illustrationslocation maps; sat images; photographs; graphs
ProgramRisk Analysis, Climate Change Geoscience
AbstractAbout one third of the global permafrost region is situated in mountainous terrain, and in Canada, large areas underlain by permafrost have mountainous topography. Although mountain topography and terrain-related mass movements yield a much greater diversity of ground materials and temperatures per unit area than encountered in polar lowlands, the governing physical principles are the same. Permafrost in mountainous regions thereby enriches the variety of perma-frost-related phenomena encountered beyond what is typically found in lowland areas. Permafrost thaw in mountains is relevant as it may increase the potential for geohazards such as debris flows, rock falls, rock avalanches, and displace-ment waves. There are also implications for hydrology, water quality, and ecosystems. We argue for better integration of permafrost research in mountainous regions with mainstream permafrost research and education in Canada.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This paper summarizes the outcomes of the workshop 'Impacts of permafrost thaw in mountain areas of Canada and beyond'. The paper outlines the state of knowledge regarding permafrost in mountainous regions in Canada and the relevance of changing permafrost conditions with respect to geohazards, infrastructure design and resource development. Research needs and recommendations to address these are provided. The paper argues for better integration of permafrost research in mountainous regions with mainstream permafrost research and education in Canada.
GEOSCAN ID296662