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TitleActive faulting in the northern Juan de Fuca Strait: implications for Victoria, British Columbia
DownloadDownloads
AuthorBarrie, J V; Greene, H G
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Current Research (Online) 2015-6, 2015, 14 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/296564
Year2015
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediadigital; on-line
File formatpdf
ProvinceWestern offshore region
AreaHaro Strait; Southern Gulf Islands; San Juan Archipelago
Lat/Long WENS-123.4167 -123.2000 48.4167 48.3333
Subjectsmarine geology; geophysics; structural geology; bedforms; structural features; structural analyses; fault zones; channels; scouring; sands; gravels; seafloor topography; bathymetry; faulting; deformation; Holocene; earthquake risk; geophysical surveys; cores; acoustic surveys; Devil's Mountain Fault Zone; backscatter strength; Quaternary
Illustrationslocation maps; profiles; schematic diagrams
ProgramWestern Canada Geohazards Project, Public Safety Geoscience
Released2015 06 22
AbstractThe Devil's Mountain Fault Zone extends east to west from Washington state to just south of Victoria in the northern Juan de Fuca Strait. Recently collected geophysical data were used to map this fault zone in detail, which show the main trace, and associated primary and secondary (conjugate) faults that occur within a 6 km wide deformation zone west of the Canada/U.S.A. boundary. The fault zone has been active in the Holocene as seen in the offset and disrupted upper Quaternary strata, seafloor displacement, and deformation within sediment cores taken close to the axis of the faults. Based on the length and previously estimated slip rates of the fault zone in Washington state, it appears to have the potential of producing a strong earthquake adjacent to Victoria, perhaps as large as magnitude 7.0 or greater.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The Devil's Mountain Fault Zone extends east to west from Washington State to just south of Victoria in the northern Strait of Juan de Fuca. Recently collected data were used to map the faults in detail, which occur within a 6 km wide zone west of the Canada-US boundary. The faults have been active in the last few thousand years, as seen in the disturbed seafloor morphology and as observed in sediment cores collected as part of this project. Based on the length and previously reported rate of movement along the primary fault, there is a potential of a magnitude 7.0 or greater earthquake occurring adjacent to Victoria.
GEOSCAN ID296564