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TitleFiber optic strain monitoring and evaluation of a slow-moving landslide near Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada
AuthorHuntley, D; Bobrowsky, P; Zhang, Q; Sladen, W; Bunce, C; Edwards, T; Hendry, M; Martin, D; Choi, E
SourceLandslide science for a safer geoenvironment, volume 1, proceedings of World Landslide Forum 3; by Sassa, K; 2014 p. 415-421, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04999-1 58
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150019
PublisherInternational Consortium on Landslides
MeetingWorld Landslide Forum 3; Beijing; CN; June 2-6, 2014
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia
NTS92H/06; 92H/11
AreaAshcroft; Thomson River
Lat/Long WENS-121.5000 -121.2500 50.7500 50.5000
Subjectsgeophysics; landslide deposits; landslides; electrical resistivity; electrical surveys; geophysical surveys; geophysical interpretations; tomography
Illustrationsphotographs; plots; location maps
ProgramTerrestrial Landslides, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractLandslides in British Columbia are costly geological hazards that have challenged the major rail companies for over 120 years. Presented here are preliminary results and analyses of fiber Bragg grating and Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry monitoring of a deforming trackside lock-block retaining wall on the Ripley Slide in the Thompson River valley south of Ashcroft, British Columbia. Fiber optic strain data are evaluated in the context of results from global positioning system monitoring, field mapping and electrical resistivity tomographic survey across the landslide. This research aims to reduce the economic, environmental, health and public safety risks that landslides pose to the railway network operating in Canada and elsewhere.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Landslides in British Columbia are costly geological hazards that have challenged the major rail companies for over 120 years. Results and analyses of fiber optic monitoring of a deforming retaining wall on the Ripley Landslide in the Thompson River valley south of Ashcroft, British Columbia are evaluated in the context of results from global positioning system monitoring and electrical resistivity mapping across the landslide. Research will reduce the economic, environmental, health and public safety risks that landslides pose to railway networks operating in Canada and elsewhere.
GEOSCAN ID296350