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TitleApplication of Canadian Geoscience Maps: Susceptibility of terrain and geohazards to extreme weather and climate change; and vulnerability of natural resources and critical infrastructure in northeastern British Columbia
AuthorHuntley, D
SourceGeological Association of Canada-Mineralogical Association of Canada, Joint Annual Meeting, Abstracts Volume vol. 37, 2014 p. 121-122
LinksOnline - En ligne
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150015
PublisherGeological Association of Canada
MeetingGeological Association of Canada Annual Meeting, Natural Hazards and Risk Session; Frederiction; CA; May 22, 2014
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia
NTS94O
AreaMaxhamish Lake
Lat/Long WENS-124.0000 -122.0000 60.0000 59.0000
Subjectsengineering geology; landslides; landslide deposits; landforms; landform classification; slope failures; slope stability; slope stability analyses
ProgramTerrestrial Landslides, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractChanges in permafrost regime, landslide activity, surface and groundwater conditions, magnitude and frequency of flooding, wind erosion, wildfires and other geohazards either positively or negatively affects our ability to access both existing and potential mineral and energy resources in Canada¿s North. Climate change will require innovative geotechnical and cultural solutions to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of future weather extremes. Together with supporting reports and databases, Geomapping for Energy and Minerals (GEM) surficial geology maps are useful tools for assessing the vulnerability of natural resources and critical infrastructure to geohazards, extreme weather and climate change. For the Maxhamish Lake map area (NTS 94O), northeastern British Columbia, three terrain susceptibility classes are recognized: 1) Least susceptible terrains - Eolian deposits, tills and bedrock have low geohazard impact scores, so natural resources and infrastructure encountered or constructed in classified polygons will be largely unaffected by extreme weather and climate change. 2) Moderately susceptible terrains - Alluvial, organic and glaciofluvial deposits have moderate impact scores. Natural resources and infrastructure encountered or constructed in classified polygons would be moderately vulnerable to the impacts of geohazards triggered by extreme weather events and climate change. 3) Highly susceptible terrains - Glaciolacustrine and colluvial deposits have a high impact scores, so natural resources and infrastructure encountered or constructed in classified polygons are likely to be highly vulnerable to the impacts of geohazards triggered extreme weather conditions and climate change. This "terrain susceptibility" map can assist land use decision makers, elected officials and communities on questions regarding the risks for new investment, exploration and development of natural resources; and help assess the impact of climate change on vulnerable energy and mineral resources and critical infrastructure in this part of Canada's north.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Geological hazards either positively or negatively affect our ability to access both existing and potential mineral and energy resources in Canada's North. Climate change will require innovative geotechnical and cultural solutions to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of future weather extremes. Together with supporting reports and databases, Geomapping for Energy and Mineral surficial geology maps are useful tools for assessing the vulnerability of natural resources and critical infrastructure to geohazards, extreme weather and climate change. Terrain susceptibility mapping can assist land use decision makers, elected officials and communities on questions regarding the risks for new investment, exploration and development of natural resources; and help assess the impact of climate change on vulnerable energy and mineral resources and critical infrastructure in this part of Canada's north.
GEOSCAN ID296346