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TitleBiogenic gas accumulations in Canada and China: geological characteristics and new insights
AuthorChen, Z; Zhang, S; Grasby, S. E.; Shuai, Y
SourceBiogenic gas fields in Canada and China: characterizations and new insights; by Chen, Z (ed.); Grasby, S (ed.); Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology vol. 63, no. 1, 2015 p. 1-3, https://doi.org/10.2113/gscpgbull.63.1.1
Year2015
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140578
PublisherCanadian Society of Petroleum Geologists
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceAlberta; Saskatchewan
NTS72; 73; 83
AreaQaidam
Lat/Long WENS-120.0000 -104.0000 56.0000 49.0000
Lat/Long WENS 92.0000 96.0000 38.0000 36.0000
Subjectsfossil fuels; stratigraphy; hydrocarbons; gas; biogenic gas; reservoirs; structural traps; mudstones; source rocks; stratigraphic analyses; Western Canada Sedimentary Basin; Sanhu Depression; Qaidam Basin; Sanhu Sag
ProgramShale-hosted petroleum ressource assesment, Geoscience for New Energy Supply (GNES)
AbstractThis Special Issue of the Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology contains nine thematic research articles on microbial gas resources and their characteristics in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin and selected Chinese basins. The nine articles are based on the results and findings from a comparative study of shallow biogenic gas resources in Canadian and Chinese basins conducted under a collaborative research agreement between PetroChina and the Geological Survey of Canada during 2010-2013. The agreement provided a unique opportunity to study shallow biogenic gas fields with different origins and characteristics in the two countries. The primary objective of the project is to better understand the critical geological controls on biogenically derived natural gas resources in shallow strata and their resource potential. The characteristics of the biogenic gas fields and available data for describing and quantifying the biogenic gas fields in the two countries are complimentary. The long production history and large amount of public data make the Southeastern Alberta Gas Field (SAGF) a unique and well documented case for defining essential elements of a biogenic gas accumulation and characterizing the production of low permeability reservoirs. With an early biogenic gas generation in the Upper Cretaceous succession, the SAFG provides an excellent example for studying the critical elements of efficient entrapment and preservation of ancient microbial gas systems. In contrast, thanks to a granted access to industrial data and a large volume of public literature, the Sanhu Sag Quaternary biogenic gas fields in the Qaidam Basin of northwestern China provide a unique case for studying a currently active microbial gas generation system. This permits an evaluation of hypotheses concerning microbial generation and accumulation dynamics for biogenic gas systems using modern microbiological techniques.
The nine research articles in this special issue cover various aspects of geological, geochemical and geophysical characterizations of the biogenic gas fields in the two countries. New insights revealed by this study include unique features of the reservoir and source rock, possible additional lateral trapping mechanisms, and architectural characteristics of the source and reservoir rocks. This special issue will be beneficial to professionals and researchers who work in the field of biogenic gas resource exploration and production. The new findings and ideas from this study may shed light on future exploration for similar microbial gas fields in existing basins and elsewhere.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This Special Issue of the Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology contains nine thematic research articles on microbial gas resources and their characteristics in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin and selected Chinese basins. The nine articles are based on the results and findings from a comparative study of shallow biogenic gas resources in Canadian and Chinese basins conducted under a collaborative research agreement between PetroChina and the Geological Survey of Canada during 2010-2013. New insights revealed by this study include unique features of the reservoir and source rock, possible additional lateral trapping mechanisms, and architectural characteristics of the source and reservoir rocks.
GEOSCAN ID296245