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TitleEvolution and morphodynamics of a prograded beach-ridge foreland, northern Baffin Island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago
AuthorSt-Hilaire-Gravel, D; Forbes, D L; Bell, T
SourceGeografiska Annaler, Series A vol. 97, issue 3, 2015 p. 615-631, https://doi.org/10.1111/geoa.12103
Year2015
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140495
PublisherSwedish Society of Anthropology and Geography
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNunavut; Northern offshore region
NTS48D/11; 48D/12; 48D/14; 48E/11; 48E/12; 48E/13
AreaCape Charles Yorke; Crocker Bay; Dundas Harbour
Lat/Long WENS -85.0000 -80.0000 75.0000 73.0000
Subjectsgravels; beach ridges; sea level changes; coastal management; coastal studies; raised beaches; marine deposits; erosion; shoreline changes; shoreface deposits; progradation; multi-beam dataset
Illustrationssatellite images; photographs; graphs
ProgramBuilding Resilience to Climate Change in Canadian Communities, Climate Change Geoscience
AbstractLandward retreat (marine transgression) is a common response of coastal systems to rising relative sea level. However, given sufficient sediment supply, the coast may advance seaward. The latter response of gravel barriers has been recorded in parts of southeastern and northwestern Canada, where seaward-rising sets of beach ridges are observed in areas of Holocene RSL rise. Cape Charles Yorke, northern Baffin Island, is a 5 km long gravel foreland characterized by seaward-rising beach-ridge crest elevations. The prograded morphology of the Cape Charles Yorke foreland is a prime example of coastal response to a combination of rising RSL and abundant sediment supply, an unusual and little-documented pattern in the Canadian Arctic. The main gravel supply to Cape Charles Yorke is likely from eroding bedrock and raised marine deposits southwest of the foreland. Although not the dominant sediment source, the Cape Charles Yorke delta contributed to the formation of the foreland by sheltering it from easterly storm waves and providing an anchor point for the prograding ridges. The truncation of relict ridges by the modern shoreline suggests a recent regime shift from continuous deposition to predominant erosion. The cause and timing of this shift are unknown but could result from a recent dwindling in sediment supply, increased accommodation space, increased wave energy, and/or an accelerated rise of relative sea level.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Cape Charles Yorke (CCY), northern Baffin Island, is a 5 km-long gravel foreland with seaward-rising beach ridges. The prograded morphology of the CCY foreland is a prime example of coastal response to a combination of rising relative sea level (RSL) and abundant sediment supply, an unusual and little-documented pattern in the Canadian Arctic. The main gravel supply to CCY is from eroding bedrock and raised marine deposits southwest of the foreland. The CCY delta contributed to the formation of the foreland by sheltering it from easterly storm waves and providing an anchor point for the prograding ridges. The truncation of relict ridges by the modern shoreline suggests a recent shift from continuous deposition to predominant erosion. The cause and timing of this shift are unknown but could result from a recent dwindling in sediment supply, increased accommodation space, increased wave energy, and/or an accelerated rise of RSL.
GEOSCAN ID296068