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TitleThe evolution of Quebec earth models used to model geomagnetically induced currents
AuthorBoteler, D H
SourceIEEE Transactions on Power Delivery (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) vol. 30, issue 5, 2014 p. 2171-2178, https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRD.2014.2379260
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140383
PublisherIEEE
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceQuebec
Subjectsgeomagnetically induced currents (GIC); geomagnetism; electric fields
Illustrationsdiagrams; graphs; location maps
ProgramNorthern Canada Geohazards Project, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractGeomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in power systems can interfere with the system operation and, in extreme cases, can damage transformers and cause power blackouts. A notable example is the magnetic disturbance of March 13, 1989 that caused a blackout of the Hydro-Québec system. The size of the GIC depends on the inducing magnetic-field variations, earth conductivity structure, and system characteristics. This paper examines the earth models developed for Québec and shows how the changes in earth models have changed the electric-field values calculated for the March 13, 1989 storm. These calculations are made using data from two magnetic observatories: one at the southern end of Qubec and one at the northern end. It is shown how the choice of magnetic-field data and uncertainty in the earth model influence the calculated electric-field values.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Space weather refers to the dynamic conditions on the Sun and in the space environment, in particular, in the near-Earth environment, that can affect critical infrastructure. NRCan operates the Canadian Space Weather Forecast Centre and conducts research into space weather effects on power systems, pipelines, radio communications and GNSS positioning to help Canadian industry understand and mitigate the effects of space weather. The effects on power systems depends on the size of electric field produced during geomagnetic storms. This paper examines the earth models developed for Quebec and shows how the changes in earth models have changed the electric field values calculated for the March 13, 1989 storm. It is shown how the choice of magnetic field data and uncertainty in the earth model influence the calculated electric field values.
GEOSCAN ID295707