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TitleCollaborative studies of regional seismicity in northeast British Columbia
AuthorFarahbod, A M; Cassidy, J F; Kao, H; Walker, D M
SourceCanadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Recorder vol. 39, no. 9, 2014 p. 40-45
LinksOnline - En ligne
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140239
PublisherCanadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceAlberta; British Columbia; Northwest Territories; Yukon
NTS83L; 83M; 84D; 84E; 84L; 84M; 85D; 93I; 93J; 93K; 93N; 93O; 93P; 94A; 94B; 94C; 94F; 94G; 94H; 94I; 94J; 94K; 94N; 94O; 94P; 95A; 95B; 95C
AreaHorn River Basin; Liard Basin
Lat/Long WENS-126.0000 -118.0000 61.0000 54.0000
Subjectsfossil fuels; geophysics; hydraulic fracturing; fracturing; seismicity; seismic data; earthquakes; earthquake risk; seismic risk; earthquake mechanisms
Illustrationslocation maps; seismic maps; seismic graphs; photographs
ProgramShale Gas - seismicity, Environmental Geoscience
AbstractThis article documents a recently-initiated, collaborative study of seismicity in northeast British Columbia. Induced seismicity is a topic of increasing, and global interest, in particular with respect to shale-gas extraction activities. There are many important questions regarding linkages between induced seismicity and hydraulic fracturing activities. Addressing these questions requires robust datasets, including earthquake catalogues and three-component broadband seismic waveforms. Here, we describe the historical datasets available for understanding the background seismicity of northeast BC (NEBC), the deployment of new seismic stations in the area, and the resulting improvements in earthquake monitoring capability.
Our preliminary investigations show an increase in both the number of small earthquakes, and a slight increase in the average magnitude of earthquakes in regions of NEBC experiencing HF activities. Deployment of additional seismic stations in mid-2013 has substantially enhanced the monitoring capability, lowering the earthquake detection threshold from ~ M 2.5 to ~ M 1.5. This has resulted in a ten-fold increase in the number of M< 2.5 earthquakes recorded, from 14 for the 4-year period of 2009-2013 to 186 for the one-year period between August 2013 and August 2014. As additional seismic stations are deployed in the neighboring regions (Northwest Territories and Alberta) and additional data are collected, much better constraints on precise earthquake locations and depths will become available, and will help to answer the numerous key questions related to hydraulic fracturing and related seismicity.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This article documents a recently-initiated, collaborative study in northeast British Columbia (NEBC) to address the issue of induced seismicity and its possible relationship to hydraulic fracturing and the development of shale gas. Here, we describe the historical datasets available for understanding the background seismicity of NEBC, the deployment of new seismic stations in the area, and the resulting improvements in earthquake monitoring capability. Our results show an increase in both the number of small earthquakes and in the maximum magnitude of earthquakes in regions of NEBC experiencing HF activities. Deployment of additional seismic stations in mid-2013 has substantially enhanced the monitoring capability. This has resulted in a ten-fold increase in the number of small earthquakes (magnitude < 2.5) recorded, from 14 for the 4-year period of 2009-2013 to 186 for the one-year period between August 2013 and August 2014.
GEOSCAN ID295310