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TitleMean annual lake evaporation / Évaporation annuelle moyenne des eaux lacustres
DownloadDownloads
AuthorCanada Surveys and Mapping Branch
SourceHydrological Atlas of Canada 17, 1978, 1 sheet
Year1978
PublisherCanada Surveys and Mapping Branch
Documentserial
Lang.English; French
Maps1 map
Map Info.hydrographic, 1:10,000,000
ProjectionLambert Conformal Conic Projection
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf; jpg
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectshydrogeology; environmental geology; hydrology; evaporation; climate; lakes
Abstract(unpublished)
The map represents the mean value (in millimetres) of the annual loss of water through the evaporation process from the surfaces of open water bodies, such as ponds and shallow lakes and reservoirs based on the 10-year period 1957 to 1966. The greatest mean annual lake evaporation (more than 900 millimetres) occurs in southwest Saskatchewan and southeast Alberta. The smaller means (less than 100 millimetres) appear in the Arctic Islands. The mean annual lake evaporation across Canada generally decreases from south to north. The map also shows the location of the stations, which are part of the Class A pan evaporation network used for the analysis and additional stations operating in 1974.The rate at which water evaporates from a lake depends primarily on two factors: first, the rate at which energy is supplied to the evaporating surface to effect the change of state of water to water vapour (requires 2.47 joules per kilogram) and secondly, the rate of diffusion of water vapour away from the surface.
GEOSCAN ID295297