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TitlePreparing to monitor and distinguish natural and induced seismicity near Norman Wells, Northwest Territories
AuthorCairns, S; Kao, H; Farahbod, A M; Snyder, D
SourceCanadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Recorder vol. 39, no. 9, 2014 p. 32-37
LinksOnline - En ligne
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140204
PublisherCanadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper
File formatpdf
ProvinceNorthwest Territories
NTS96C/12; 96C/13; 96D/09; 96D/10; 96D/11; 96D/14; 96D/15; 96D/16; 96E/01; 96E/02; 96E/03; 96E/06; 96E/07; 96E/08; 96F/04; 96F/05
AreaNorman Wells; Tulita; Mackenzie River
Lat/Long WENS-127.5000 -125.5000 65.5000 64.5000
Subjectsgeophysics; seismic data; seismicity; seismic interpretations; seismic surveys; seismic risk; earthquake risk; hydraulic fracturing; fracturing
Illustrationslocation maps; tables; photographs; seismic graphs; seismic profiles
ProgramShale Gas - seismicity, Environmental Geoscience
AbstractIn 2012, three Sahtu communities in the NWT of Canada expressed concerns about the environmental impact hydrofracking technology would have on the region around Norman Wells, asking specifically whether hydraulic fracturing could cause earthquakes. In September 2013, four new seismic stations were sited on bedrock exposed in low foothills located 24--52 km from Norman Wells airport and 24-53 km from recently active exploration wells. The station distribution provides good triangulation angles for locating epicenters of small magnitude (<2) seismic events within the array. In the first two months, 101 earthquakes were located and assigned magnitudes ranging from 1.7 to 4.6. In comparison, during this same period, the national seismic network located 13 of these earthquakes within this same region, within 400 km radius of Norman Wells. Further analysis of data from these stations will cover the period of active hydrofracking tests and the recovery period.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Three Sahtu communities in the NWT of Canada expressed concerns in 2012 about the environmental impact proposed hydrofracking technology would have on the Mackenzie Valley region, asking specifically whether hydraulic fracturing could cause earthquakes. In September 2013, four new seismic stations were installed in low foothills located within 50 km of the Norman Wells airport and recently active petroleum exploration wells. In the first two months, 101 earthquakes were located and assigned magnitudes ranging from 1.7 to 4.6 while, during this same period, the national seismic network located 13 of these earthquakes within this same region. This establishes the normal background seismicity for this Mackenzie Valley region. Further analysis of data from these stations will cover the period of active hydrofracking tests and the recovery period.
GEOSCAN ID295168