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TitleSurficial geology, district of North Vancouver, British Columbia
DownloadDownloads
AuthorBednarski, J M
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Canadian Geoscience Map 203, 2014, 1 sheet, https://doi.org/10.4095/295128
Year2014
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Editionprelim.
Documentserial
Lang.English
Maps1 map
Map Info.surficial geology, glacial deposits and landforms, 1:20,000
ProjectionUniversal Transverse Mercator Projection, zone 10 (NAD83)
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatreadme
File formatpdf; rtf; xml; shp; xml
ProvinceBritish Columbia
NTS92G/06; 92G/07
AreaNorth Vancouver
Lat/Long WENS-123.1333 -122.9333 49.3750 49.2917
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; organic deposits; alluvial deposits; colluvial deposits; fluvial deposits; landslide deposits; flood plains; lacustrine deposits; marine deposits; intertidal deposits; beach deposits; glacial features; glacial deposits; glacial landforms; glaciomarine deposits; glaciofluvial deposits; tills; ice contact deposits; Cenozoic; Quaternary
ProgramQuantitative risk assessment, Public Safety Geoscience
Image
Released2014 10 07
AbstractThe map area on the flank of North Shore Mountains is incised by three glacially-widened valleys. Glacial cycles caused sporadic erosion and deposition of sediments mantling the slopes. Most surficial deposits are from the last glaciation; however, some exposures and seismic data show older sediments, especially within buried valleys. During deglaciation, the sea level reached 200 m and meltwater issuing from the valleys formed glaciomarine deltas. Falling postglacial sea levels caused the deltas to be incised. Modern rivers mainly re-mobilize the older sediments. Other contemporary deposits include alluvial fans and debris flows on steep mountain slopes, and landslides on the flanks of incised valleys. Anthropogenic alterations of the landscape include land reclamation along the waterfront and infilling of valleys and slopes to provide level building sites and to mitigate the affects of flooding from mountain streams.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This surficial geology map covers the flank of North Shore Mountains which are incised by three glacially-widened valleys. Glacial cycles caused sporadic erosion and deposition of sediments mantling the slopes. Most surficial deposits are from the last glaciation, however, some exposures and seismic data show older sediments, especially within buried valleys. During deglaciation the sea level reached 200 m and meltwater issuing from the valleys formed glaciomarine deltas. Falling postglacial sea levels caused the deltas to be incised. Modern rivers mainly re-mobilize the older sediments. Other contemporary deposits include alluvial fans and debris flows on steep mountain slopes, and landslides on the flanks of incised valleys. Anthropogenic alterations of the landscape include land reclamation along the waterfront and infilling of valleys and slopes to provide level building sites and to mitigate the affects of flooding from mountain streams.
GEOSCAN ID295128