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TitleStrength of stick-slip and creeping subduction megathrusts from heat flow observations
AuthorGao, X; Wang, K
SourceScience vol. 345, issue 6200, 2014 p. 1038-1041, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1255487
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140105
PublisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
AreaJapan
Lat/Long WENS139.0000 146.0000 40.0000 36.0000
Lat/Long WENS174.0000 180.0000 -36.0000 -42.0000
Subjectstectonics; structural geology; faults, slip; creep; subduction; tectonic elements; tectonic setting; tectonic interpretations; faults, thrust
Illustrationslocation maps; plots; cross-sections
ProgramWestern Canada Geohazards Project, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractSubduction faults, called megathrusts, can generate large and hazardous earthquakes.The mode of slip and seismicity of a megathrust is controlled by the structural complexity of the fault zone. However, the relative strength of a megathrust based on the mode of slip is far from clear.The fault strength affects surface heat flow by frictional heating during slip.We model heat-flow data for a number of subduction zones to determine the fault strength.We find that smooth megathrusts that produce great earthquakes tend to be weaker and therefore dissipate less heat than geometrically rough megathrusts that slip mainly by creeping.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Subduction zone megathrusts can generate large and hazardous earthquakes. The mode of slip and seismicity of a megathrust is determined by the ruggedness of subducted seafloor. However, the relative strength of a megathrust based on the mode of slip is far from clear. The fault strength impacts surface heat flow measurement by frictional heating during slip. We model the heat flow data for a number of subduction zones to determine the fault strength. We find that megathrusts that produce great earthquakes tend to be weaker and therefore dissipate less heat than megathrusts that slip by creeping.
GEOSCAN ID294813