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TitleFracture systems controls on fluid flow in the regional sedimentary rock aquifer system of Montérégie Est, southern Québec, Canada
AuthorLadevèze, P; Laurencelle, M; Lefebvre, R; Rouleau, A; Crow, H; Rivard, C
SourceGeoMontréal 2013, Canadian Geotechnical Conference, abstracts; 2013 p. 1
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140055
PublisherIAH
MeetingGéoMontréal 2013, the 66th Canadian Geotechnical Conference and the 11th Joint CGS/IAH-CNC Groundwater Conference; Montreal; CA; September 29 - October 3, 2013
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper
File formatdocx; pdf
ProvinceQuebec
NTS31H/01; 31H/02; 31H/03; 31H/06; 31H/07; 31H/08; 31H/09; 31H/10; 31H/11; 31H/14; 31H/15; 31H/16; 31I/02
AreaMontérégie Est; Sorel; Tracy; Monterigians; Rouville; Granby; Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu; Yamaska River; St-Hugues; St-Dominique; Mont St-Hilaire; St-Césaire
Lat/Long WENS-73.5000 -72.0000 46.2500 45.0000
Subjectshydrogeology; groundwater; groundwater circulation; groundwater flow; groundwater regimes; groundwater discharge; aquifers; Richelieu/Lake Champlain Watershed; Yamaska Watershed
Illustrationslocation maps; logs; cross-sections; photographs
ProgramAquifer Assessment & support to mapping, Groundwater Geoscience
LinksOnline - En ligne
AbstractThe Montérégie Est regional rock aquifer system covers about 9000 km2 in an area located south-east of Montreal. It includes three watersheds, namely those of the Richelieu and Yamaska Rivers, and the Missisquoi Bay. At the regional scale, groundwater is flowing from the Appalachian Uplands through the St. Lawrence Lowlands. The sedimentary rocks in Montérégie Est are fractured and their structural properties are quite diverse. In the St. Lawrence Lowlands, rocks are slightly deformed, while rocks in the Appalachians are folded and faulted, and affected by low-grade metamorphism. Lithologies and structural contexts are expected to influence groundwater flow of this hydrogeological system. The groundwater resource assessment project in Montérégie Est includes several interrelated studies, one of which is the characterization of the controls exerted by geological structures and fracture networks on groundwater flow. Data collected for this specific study include hydraulic tests from consultant reports, as well as field data on rock fractures. Fieldwork consisted in borehole geophysical logging, especially acoustic televiewer logs and flowmeter testing, and outcrop observations and measurements. The methodology involves two steps. First, the fracture pattern was characterized using borehole televiewer and outcrop data. Fracture sets were defined within the regional aquifer, which allowed for the interpretation of the various structural contexts. Preferential orientations for open fractures were identified and then compared to the in-situ stress field. Secondly, hydraulic tests carried out in the study area were compiled, analysed, and compared for each structural context. The drawdown behavior provided information on the potential fracturing contribution to fluid flow. Hydraulic properties interpreted from the tests helped quantify the aquifer anisotropy induced by dominant open fracture sets in the different structural domains of this study area.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This presentation is part of the Richelieu-Yamaska project (in Montérégie Est, southern QC, 9000 km2). It aims to characterize the controls exerted by geological structures and fracture networks on groundwater flow. The sedimentary rocks in Montérégie Est (St. Lawrence Lowlands and Appalachians) are fractured and their structural properties are quite diverse. Lithologies and structural contexts are expected to influence groundwater flow of this hydrogeological system. Fieldwork consisted in borehole geophysical logging, especially acoustic televiewer logs and flowmeter testing, and outcrop observations and measurements.
GEOSCAN ID293960