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TitleCoastal stability assessment, a case study of 5 locations within the Coronation Gulf, Nunavut
AuthorWhalen, D; Fraser, P; Salive, B
SourceArcticNet (ASM2013), programme; 2013 p. 193-194
LinksOnline - En ligne
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20140010
Meeting9th ArcticNet Annual Scientific Meeting; Halifax, NS; CA; December 9-13, 2013
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceNunavut
AreaCoronation Gulf
Lat/Long WENS-116.0000 -108.0000 69.0000 68.0000
Subjectsenvironmental geology; marine geology; coastal environment; coastal studies; coastal erosion; coastal management; shorelines; shoreline changes
Programenvironmental impacts and adaptation in the northern environment, Environmental Geoscience
AbstractCoronation Gulf is located between Victoria Island and mainland Canada, and is within the Kitikmeot Region of Nunavut. The area is home to a number of communities and mining projects that include the development of ports and associated mining infrastructure (processing, accommodation and storage facilities) adjacent to the coast. Such activities can affect and be affected by coastal erosion and sedimentation processes. Studies of historical coastal change at key sites provide baseline data for environmental assessment of these critical areas. This project examined coastal change at two communities Kugluktuk and Cambridge Bay, two potential port sites at Grays Bay and Bathurst Inlet and one existing port site at Hope Bay. Historical air photos and more recent satellite imagery were used to assess coastal change for all five areas within the Coronation Gulf. Aerial oblique video were used to map the physical character of the coastline and to validate the coastal change results from historical photos.
In general the Coronation Gulf coastline is dominated by outcropping bedrock and unconsolidated glacially derived sediments and has remained relatively stable throughout the 60 year study period. However, areas with unconsolidated material can be actively mobile at select locations. The coastline surrounding the community of Kugluktuk has experienced the highest coastal change rate among the 5 study locations with an average retreat rate of 0.76 m/yr. However sections of the Kugluktuk shore to the west of town near the barge landing site are retreating more rapidly (1.2 m/yr) and are susceptible to drastic changes during coastal storms. Coastal change rates within Grays Bay are much less severe. This is partially attributed to the abundance of bedrock cliffs and the reduced impact of ocean waves on the coast line as the majority of the area is protected by Hepburn Island. Some sections of the Grays Bay coast have aggraded almost 50 meters since 1957. Bathurst Inlet, Hope Bay and Cambridge Bay are geographically protected from ocean waves and mobile ice and exhibit very low coastal change rates as a result. The shores along Hope Bay are the most stable with average change rates of 0.02 m/yr. However there does appear to be some localized accumulation of sediment at river mouths and adjacent to anthropogenic features like the port facility in Hope Bay.
This study provides an interesting prospective and comparison of coastal change at 5 key locations within Coronation Gulf. Knowledge of the magnitude and spatial variability of coastal change will enable stakeholders involved in the development of Coronation Gulf ports and communities to design appropriate infrastructure for the regional and local conditions. This will contribute to the viability of the mineral and energy industries in the Arctic and the well-being of residents in Nunavut.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The project examined coastal change at two communities Kugluktuk and Cambridge Bay, two potential port sites at Grays Bay and Bathurst Inlet and one existing port site at Hope Bay. Historical air photos and more recent satellite imagery were used to assess coastal change for all five areas within the Coronation Gulf. Aerial oblique video were used to map the physical character of the coastline and to validate the coastal change results from historical photos. In general the Coronation Gulf coastline is dominated by outcropping bedrock and unconsolidated glacially derived sediments and has remained relatively stable throughout the 60 year study period. However, areas with unconsolidated material can be actively mobile at select locations. Knowledge of the magnitude and spatial variability of coastal change will enable stakeholders involved in the development of Coronation Gulf ports and communities to design appropriate infrastructure for the regional and local conditions.
GEOSCAN ID293856