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TitleSurficial geology, Yellowknife area, Northwest Territories, parts of NTS 85-J/7, NTS 85-J/8, NTS 85-J/9 and NTS 85-J/10
DownloadDownloads
AuthorWolfe, S A; Kerr, D E
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Canadian Geoscience Map 183, 2014, 1 sheet, https://doi.org/10.4095/293725
Year2014
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
Maps1 map
Map Info.surficial geology, surficial deposits and landforms, 1:25,000
ProjectionUniversal Transverse Mercator Projection, zone 11 (NAD83)
Mediadigital; on-line
File formatreadme
File formatpdf; rtf; xml; xls; shp
ProvinceNorthwest Territories
NTS85J/07NE; 85J/08NW; 85J/08NE; 85J/09SE; 85J/09SW; 85J/10SE
AreaYellowknife; Yellowknife Bay
Lat/Long WENS-114.5667 -114.2000 62.7250 62.3833
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; glacial deposits; glacial features; landforms; terrain types; organic deposits; alluvial deposits; glaciolacustrine deposits; glaciofluvial deposits; Holocene; Pleistocene; Slave Province; Cenozoic; Quaternary
Illustrationslocation maps
ProgramLand-based Infrastructure, Climate Change Geoscience
Image
Released2014 04 09
AbstractYellowknife Bay was covered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet, with generally southwestward ice flow, during the Late Wisconsinan glaciation until about 10,000 BP. With ice retreat, Glacial Lake McConnell inundated the area, which was replaced by ancestral Great Slave Lake as water levels declined. Surficial geology includes widely-exposed bedrock, and a dominance of fine-grained sediments within low-lying areas deposited within deep glaciolacustrine and shallow post-glacial lake settings. Other sediments include extensive subaqueous outwash deposits of sand and gravel, re-sorted at the surface by wave-action. Wave-washed bedrock is also common, with occasional perched boulders on bedrock and little if any exposed till. Vegetation consists mainly of open to dense forests of black spruce, jack pine, and paper birch mixed with marshes, fens and peat bogs in low-lying areas. Permafrost is extensively discontinuous in the area, occurring within most organic deposits as well as alluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Yellowknife Bay was covered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet, with generally southwestward ice flow, during the late Wisconsinan glaciation until about 10,000 BP. With ice retreat, Glacial Lake McConnell inundated the area, which was replaced by ancestral Great Slave Lake as water levels declined. Surficial geology includes widely-exposed bedrock, and a dominance of fine-grained sediments within low-lying areas deposited within deep glaciolacustrine and shallow post-glacial lake settings. Other sediments include extensive subaqueous outwash deposits of sand and gravel, re-sorted at the surface by wave-action. Wave-washed bedrock is also common, with occasional perched boulders on bedrock and little if any exposed till. Vegetation consists mainly of open to dense forests of black spruce, jack pine, and paper birch mixed with marshes, fens and peat bogs in low-lying areas
GEOSCAN ID293725