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TitleTsunami impact to Washington and northern Oregon from segment ruptures on the southern Cascadia subduction zone
AuthorPriest, G R; Zhang, Y; Witter, R C; Wang, K; Goldfinger, C; Stimely, L
SourceNatural Hazards 2014 p. 1-22, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-014-1041-7
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20130380
PublisherSpringer
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf; html
AreaCape Mendocino; Cape Blanco; Newport; United States
Lat/Long WENS-127.0000 -123.0000 49.0000 40.0000
Subjectsgeophysics; marine geology; tsunami; health hazards; seismic risk; earthquake risk; earthquakes; earthquake magnitudes; Cascadia subduction zone; geological hazards
Illustrationslocation maps; tables
ProgramAssessing Earthquake Geohazards, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractThis paper explores the size and arrival of tsunamis in Oregon and Washington from the most likely partial ruptures of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) in order to determine (1) how quickly tsunami height declines away from sources, (2) evacuation time before significant inundation, and (3) extent of felt shaking that would trigger evacuation. According to interpretations of offshore turbidite deposits, the most frequent partial ruptures are of the southern CSZ. Combined recurrence of ruptures extending *490 km from Cape Mendocino, California, to Waldport, Oregon (segment C) and *320 km from Cape Mendocino to Cape Blanco, Oregon (segment D), is *530 years. This recurrence is similar to frequency of full-margin ruptures on the CSZ inferred from paleoseismic data and to frequency of the largest distant tsunami sources threatening Washington and Oregon, *Mw 9.2 earthquakes from the Gulf of Alaska. Simulated segment C and D ruptures
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Not all Cascadia megathrust earthquake rupture the whole margin. Offshore turbidite deposits indicate that the most frequent partial ruptures of the Cascadia megathrust are at southern end of the subduction zone. This paper explores the size and arrival of tsunamis in Oregon and Washington from the these partial ruptures. With numerical simulations, we determine how quickly tsunami height declines away from sources, evacuation time before significant inundation, and extent of felt shaking that would trigger evacuation. The work helps governments and coastal communities plan for tsunamis produced by smaller but more frequent Cascadia megathrust earthquakes.
GEOSCAN ID293435